Category Archives: Books

The Ice Cream Blonde: The Whirlwind Life and Mysterious Death of Screwball Comedienne Thelma Todd

ice cream blondeThis authoritative biography was written by Michelle Morgan back in 2015. It traces the life of American actress and businesswoman Thelma Todd (29 July 1906 – 16 December 1935, from a vivacious little girl who tried to assuage her parents’ grief over her brother’s death to an aspiring teacher, turned reluctant beauty queen, to an outspoken movie starlet and restaurateur.

Increasingly disenchanted with Hollywood, in 1934 Todd opened Thelma Todd’s Sidewalk Café, a hot spot that attracted fans, tourists, and celebrities. Despite success in film and business, privately the beautiful actress was having a difficult year – receiving disturbing threats from a stranger known as the Ace and having her home ransacked – when she was found dead in a garage near her café.

An inquest concluded that her death, at age just 29, was accidental. But in this book, which draws on interviews, photographs, documents, and extortion notes (some of which was not previously available to the public), Morgan offers compelling new evidence that Thelma was in fact murdered. But by whom? The suspects include Thelma’s movie-director lover, her would-be-gangster ex-husband, and the thugs who were pressuring her to install gaming tables in her popular café – including a never-before-named mobster.

Fans of Thelma Todd, Hollywood’s Golden Age and real-life murder mysteries should add this to their list of must-reads. Also, the story is worthy of a Netflix series.

Available from Gazelle Books in the UK: https://www.gazellebookservices.co.uk/GazelleBooks/sresult.pgm?search1=9781613730386&searchtype=advanced

Arrow Video FrightFest – Twenty Blood Years | Day Two – Argento on Fear, arthouse teenage angst and demonic lust

So its Day Two and the big star of the day was the legendary Dario Argento, who did a candid Q&A before a signing session for his autobiography, Dario Argento: Fear, which has been newly translated from Italian and given a slick makeover by FAB Press.

Alan Jones (Argento’s No.1 fan and long-time friend) moderated the 30-minute interview, which concentrated on the book and why Argento had decided now was the time to tell his story. Interestingly, Jones’ admitted that even though he’s a close friend of Argento’s, he learned so many new things while reading his autobiography, which covers many very personal recollections, including the Italian director’s close relationship with his photographer mother and traditionalist father, and his suicidal thoughts, which opens the book.

He also looks back at how he learned to become a film-maker not by attending film school, but by doing a Jean-Luc Godard – totally immersing himself in films (both good and bad) while studying in Paris – a time that he describes as ‘a marvellous moment in my life’. He also looks over his film career, which he also admits was quite difficult to do – even embarrassing at times. Jones ended the session by asking Argento what song would sum him up — and he got a huge round of applause and a hail of cheers when he said: My Way – the Sid Vicious version.

To pre-order the book direct from FAB Press: CLICK HERE

The queue at Cineworld Leicester Square for Dario’s signing

Now onto today’s screamings…

KNIVES AND SKIN
Just like Heathers and Dazed and Confused (two films that informs its DNA), this mystical Midwest coming-of-age drama from director Jennifer Reeder (making her feature debut) just may be a cult film in the making.

In rural Illinois, a drum majorette’s disappearance traumatises the small town residents as secrets are revealed, destroying some relationships and strengthening others. Three girls form a bond in the aftermath of the tragedy as everyone struggles with their own infidelities, dreams and family cruelties while the manhunt continues.

The FrightFest blurb describes it as ‘Sofia Coppola meets David Lynch on the set of High School Musical‘, and I tend to agree, but this teen noir fantasy stands on its own thanks to its gorgeous lighting (very giallo-esque) and costumes, and its astute feminist take on teenage angst, rage and disillusionment (as seen in the relationships between the awkward teens) and parental grief. I’m sure many may ask ‘What’s it about?’ and find it a tad pretentious (A cappella, anyone?) – but it so deserves several viewings to really get all the layered nuances. For me, it’s an assured debut with arthouse written all over it.

 

BLOOD & FLESH: THE REEL LIFE & GHASTLY DEATH OF AL ADAMSON
Director David Gregory tells the bizarre and grim demise of one of Hollywood’s exploitation bad boys. Check out my full review here.

PORNO
Abe (Evan Daves) is a pervert with a guilty conscience. Todd (Larry Saperstein) is his spaced out BFF and partner in crime. Chaz (Jillian Mueller) hides her feelings behind a thick layer of Goth eye liner. Ricky (Glenn Stott) is the star jock with a secret he dare not expose. And projectionist Metal Head Jeff (Robbie Tann) has turned to Jesus to stop smoking. What these employees could never have guessed is that the wholesome movie theatre they work at had a porno past. And when they uncover and screen one of the lurid films, they unwittingly unleash a sex demon (Katelyn Pearce)…

Director Keola Racela (making his feature debut here) has crafted a hugely enjoyable slice of 1980s-style horror (set in 1992) – that’s like an R-rated Scooby Doo meets Stranger Things fantasy adventure, but with a nod to Lamberto Bava’s Demons. This is probably the most perfect film for a film festival like FrightFest as its set entirely in a cinema (although a retro one not a gleaming multiplex) and the humour draws on our love of the horror genre. The characters – all outsiders with sexually repressed desires – are well-drawn, and effortlessly executed by the talented young cast. The blood and gore is on the right side of cheese and the irreverent script doesn’t hold back on making light of right-wing Christian American ideals (thank you!). My only issue is with the title, Porno, which is a bit of a misnomer as the sex film the kids watch actually looks like its been inspired by one of Kenneth Anger’s arthouse films – most specifically, 1969’s Invocation of My Demon Brother, as the film features a satanic ritual involving a demonic incantation (very much like Anger’s). But aside from that title, I’d gladly give this one repeated viewings.

Here’s a clip to whet your appetite.

Little Did You Know: The Confessions of David McGillivray | Sanitary wipes at the ready! You won’t be able to put down this unbridled tell-all!

Described by Jonathan Ross as ‘a comedy legend’ and journalist Matthew Sweet as ‘the Truffaut of smut’, David McGillivray is best known to cult film fans as the writer behind Pete Walker and Norman J Warren’s exploitation classics Satan’s Slaves and Frightmare amongst others, but this outrageously funny man also had his ‘sticky’ hand in writing a host of British sex comedies in the 1970s, and for providing his best mate Julian Clary with some of his most salacious gags.

And to quote Clary, it’s time to ‘break out the sanitary wipes’ as McGillivray reveals how his anti-establishment lifestyle stretches back to his teenage years and journeys six decades, taking us through the cocaine-lined world of London’s media industry, the tragic heights of the AIDS epidemic, and the sinful celluloid backstreets of Soho.

The grandson of an acrobat, McGillivray (born 7 September 1947) knew from the age of four and a half that he wanted to get into the movies. His wish was granted virtually from the day he was expelled from school – except that, instead of starring in films, he packed them. Briefly the UK’s youngest film critic, McGillivray wrote his first film – a travelogue about Yugoslavia – when he was 23, then moved onto a succession of cheap shockers and skin flicks. After Margaret Thatcher dealt killer blows to the UK’s independent film industry, McGillivray found alternative employment in radio, TV and theatre, becoming Clary’s long-serving scriptwriter.

Around the year 2000, he put these careers temporarily on hold as he began hosting wild drug-fuelled parties at his home in London’s King’s Cross district. They were attended by some of the biggest names of stage, screen, music and fashion. The revelations of what went on under the figurative noses of law enforcement agencies and the literal noses of McG and his high-flying guests are not for the faint-hearted…

You’ll be shocked and amused in equal measures at what this ‘bossy, annally retentive gay drug dealer with a penchant for pornography’ (McGillivray’s own description of himself) reveals between the pages of his unbridled autobiography, one that you won’t be able to put it down until you’ve read every single witty word and wildly adventurous anecdote. I can’t wait for the film adaptation!

Little Did You Know: The Confessions of David McGillivray is available from 1 June (online) and hits the high streets on 1 August.

Order now direct from FAB PRESS

The Damned | Book Review

Andy Ellis reviews The Damned by Nick Riddle.

I’ve just finished this excellent book on Hammer’s sci-fi gem (which was originally released in the UK on 20 May 1963) – highly recommended for fans of Hammer, Joseph Losey, British sci-fi, and quality film criticism. It’s the latest in the Constellations series published by Auteur, who also do the terrific Devil’s Advocates series. This one is up there with that series’ books on Frenzy and Witchfinder General (both by Ian Cooper), Suspiria (by Alexandra Heller-Nicholas), Texas Chain Saw Massacre (by James Rose) and Dead of Night (by Jez Connolly & David Owain Bates).

It covers the historical context of the film, its links to preceding and following genre works, and to other of Losey’s films, and themes of what the author describes as a ‘genre-hopping story that explores the links between youth culture, authority and nuclear terror’. Intelligent, but accessible writing – like a greatly extended version of those incisive paragraphs in one of Jonathan Rigby’s books on a key film [please do a book-length in-depth study of one film, Mr Rigby !]. Fascinating observations on aspects like the use of Elisabeth Frink’s sculpture, the musical score, the performances, and the camera work – I especially enjoyed his in-depth analysis of 2 or 3 key sequences.

Riddle is not afraid to discuss the films flaws, especially some plot points and Shirley Anne Field’s acting, although some of these contribute to the film’s overall impact. Like all the Auteur books, it suffers slightly from having very few illustrations, but the descriptions of scenes is very good. The book really makes me want to watch the film again – I learnt so much that I’d not spotted or thought about before. I’ve always liked The Damned, but I now rate it as one of Hammer’s greatest achievements. All together now, “Black leather, black leather, rock, rock, rock…”

Inside Bray Studios – The Complete Story of Hammer’s House Studio

In 1951, Hammer Film Productions took up residence at Down Place, a derelict country house on the banks of the Thames outside Windsor, and over the following decade turned it into the most unique film studio in England. This exciting new tome from Hammer historian Wayne Kinsey and Peveril Publishing traces the studio’s history from Hammer and beyond, to its closure with plans to develop the site into housing.

Over 344 pages packed with hundreds of behind-the-scenes photos, plans and drawings, you get a virtual tour of the studio, showing how Hammer’s skilled technicians turned Down Place into a working studio, complete with a backlot of building sets that became iconic in eyes of Hammer fans. The last Hammer production made at Bray was The Mummy’s Shroud, which wrapped on 21 October 1966, but the story does not end there as an incredible amount of film, TV and music work has also taken place there since Hammer left on 19 November 1966.

It practically reinvented itself as a centre for stop motion and special model effects over the next 20 years, with Jim Danforth working on When Dinosaurs Ruled the Earth there, while Gerry Anderson’s sfx team set up camp in Stage 2 for Space 1999 and Terrahawks, where lots of model and miniature work was created for Ridley Scott’s Alien. But the other stages continued to be used for for a host of genre favourites, including Trog and Rocky Horror Picture Show, which were filmed almost exclusively at nearby Oakley Court, and this book includes a complete list of the films and TV shows shot here, which, for a film location nerd like me, I found most illuminating.

There’s also three separate chapters on the 1998, 1999 and 2007 Bray Open Days that were organised by Donald Fearney and Simon Greetham with some great photos, many sent in by fellow fans, of what has now become something quite historic and never to be repeated, especially since the passing of many of those who worked at the studio.

Kinsey concludes his tour with the sad demise of the studio showing evidence of the chronic damp damage that destroyed the interior of Down Place and the redevelopment plans to save it by converting into housing. Currently, the studio has reopened to a handful of productions as the redevelopment plans are finalised, but a part of the studio has already had to be demolished because it was beyond repair and the jury is still out on the future of the main house.

ORDER DIRECT FROM PEVERIL PUBLISHING

Save

Little Shoppe of Horrors reveals the epic untold saga behind Frankenstein: The True Story

Frankenstein The True StoryOne of my favourite TV events growing up in the 1970s was Frankenstein: The True Story, the two-part tele-movie in which novelist Christopher Isherwood (and his artist partner Don Barchardy) put their own stamp on Mary Shelley’s Gothic creation. Lavishly shot in the UK, it featured a stunning cast, including James Mason, Jane Seymour, David McCallum and Leonard Whiting. Newcomer Michael Sarrazin played the Creature as we had never seen before – as a beautiful young man who is rejected by his creator when he starts to deteriorate before our very eyes…

When Second Sight brought out the original 176-minute cut on DVD in the UK back in 2014, I wrote a long post about this must-see modern classic – which got its biggest accolade recently when Guillermo del Toro revealed just how inspiring this take on the Frankenstein tale was for him personally.

Last year, however, an entire issue of Little Shoppe of Horrors (No38), guest edited by US producer/director Sam Irvin, covered every single aspect of the production – from conception to release. When I got hold of a copy a couple of months back, I poured over every page and read it about five or six times, taking it wherever I went… I’m now looking to get a second copy as I’ve worn the pages out on this one.

Entitled The Epic Untold Saga Behind Frankenstein: The True Story, this special issue of LSOH is a must-have as it is the last word on the production, as well as a revealing 50,000-word exposé on movie making in the 1970s – it also features a covetable cover from Mark Maddox.

Now, I had never heard of producer Hunt Stromberg Jr before (even though he worked on my favourite TV show, Lost in Space), but after reading Sam’s in-depth feature, I now have enormous respect for the guy who put his heart and soul, and blood, sweat and tears into bringing his creation to life.

Among the other tantalising chapters there’s interviews with many of the actors, including Leonard Whiting,  Jane Seymour, David McCallum, Nicola Pagett and Julian Barnes, as well as David Boyce (aka the thug who ended up on the cutting room floor); and a great little piece by James Mason’s grandson, James Duke Mason.

Frankenstein: The True StoryThere’s also informative features on Gil Mellé’s score and the various edits, and some interesting interviews with Ian Lewis (Associate Producer) and John Stoneman (First Assistant Director), and director Jack Smith’s son. Reading these recollections is like being put in a time machine and being sent back to the summer of 1971, when the film was being made, and Sam has certainly done his homework on the nitty gritty of the production – and then some.

Having read the Avon novelisation countless times myself, a huge plus was the inclusion of the missing pages (which I have now photocopied and inserted into my copy of the paperback tie-in), while Sam’s analysis of Isherwood and Bachardy’s screenplay sheds revealing light on just how they fused elements of their own selves into the major characters.

Sam’s must-read issue of Little Shoppe of Horrors is up for a Rondo (the Oscars of the Classic Horror community) and I do wish him luck, as well as all the other nominees who have been doing some amazing work within the genre over the past year.

If you’d like to cast your vote, please note it closes Sunday 8 April at 12midnight, so act fast: https://rondoaward.com/rondoaward.com/blog/

UK fans can order a copy of Little Shoppe of Horrors (No38) through…
FAB Press: http://www.fabpress.com/little-shoppe-of-horrors-no-38.html
Hemlock Books: http://www.hemlockbooks.co.uk/Shop/category/4

If you are in the US, you can get it here: http://www.littleshoppeofhorrors.com/

 

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Son of Unsung Horrors | Rediscovering the neglected genre films of yesterday has never been so much fun!

Son of Unsung Horrors

Just when you thought your bookshelf was safe comes Son of Unsung Horrors, a brand new exploration of some 200 neglected, overlooked, and seemingly under-appreciated genre films from the silents to the 1970s.

Gorgeously illustrated with vintage photos, lobby cards and posters and boasting a Foreward from John Landis and covetable cover art by Paul Garner, this 400-page tome joins Unsung Horrors and the über-collectable 70s Monster Memories as another must-have from We Belong Dead maestro Eric McNaughton.

Each film has been selected, appraised and held aloft by a host of film fans (from newbie writers to bloggers and published authors) and there are gems galore just waiting for your to rediscover.

Although listed in alphabetical order at the end of the book, Eric and co-editor extraordinaire Darrell Buxton have placed the titles at random. This ends up working to the book’s advantage – as you never know what fantastic find is lurking over the page.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Having seen quite a few of the titles myself, I immediately checked out all of the unfamiliar ones first – and there are some real doozies. There’s the suave Paul Naschy giallo Blue Eyes of the Broken Doll; the spellbinding Book of Stone (remade in 2009 as El Libro de Piedra); and the DH Lawrence-inspired Corruption of Chris Miller, which all hail from Spain.

Over in Italy, meanwhile, there’s the Copenhagen-set film noir Crimes of the Black Cat; the Franco Nero giallo The Fifth Cord, which teases a pulsating Morricone beat; and the Bergmanesque chiller The Long Night of the Veronique; plus there’s some other tasty Euro entries, including the oddball Death Laid an Egg and Jean Rollin’s Normandy-set love letter to expressionism Demoniacs.

Well-researched and written up with passion and style, these entries really got me very excited to seek them out. The same goes with the chapters about Jean Epstein’s 1928 classic La Chute de la Maison Usher and the Tower of the Seven Hunchbacks, a 1940’s comedy thriller with elements of Dali, Buñuel and Fritz Lang (now that I have to see).

The Fifth Cord (Giornata nera per l’ariete), 1971

Horrors of Malformed Men, 1969

Demoniacs (Les Démoniaques), 1974

Further afield, some Japanese flicks certainly piqued my interest, including the euro guro Horrors of Malformed Men (which I’ve known about – because of a single lurid photo in Denis Gifford’s Pictorial History of Horror Movies, but never actually seen), the spectral spookfest Ghost Story of Kasane Swamp, and the freakish curiosity Blind Beast, based on a story by mystery writer Taro Hirai (aka Japan’s Edgar Allan Poe, Edogawa Rampo).

A little closer to home, 1928’s Maria Marten maybe impossible to see – but the history behind the true crime makes for fascinating reading. Then there’s the 1940s British suspensers The Ghost of Rashmon Hall and Crimes at the Dark House, the latter featuring Tod Slaughter at his madest, which I shall be checking out soon.

Of course, there are a few titles I won’t be in any rush to see (sorry, I’m not going to vent here), but there are some I’m now tracking down: namely the 1971 man versus insects docu-drama The Hellstrom Chronicle and the formerly-banned British public information film The Finishing Line, which puts a dystopian spin on a school sports day.

But the Unsung Horror that gets my vote as the book’s stand-out gem goes to the 1970 British thriller, I Start Counting, starring Jenny Agutter (in one of her first movie roles) as a 14-year-old girl who develops an unhealthy interest in a series of local sex killings. Boasting a terrific score from Basil Kirchin (I’ve since bought the Johnny Trunk album re-relase), I’ve got this one on the top of my list to seek out (see the link below).

Now, I’ve since gone back to the start of the book to read all those titles that I’m more familar with, and some have reignited my love for some genre classics, including Phase IV, The Power and – yes, Vincent Price’s Madhouse. Oh and talking of Vinnie, I’ve also contributed a chapter on the first cinematic adaptation of a HP Lovecraft story, 1964’s The Haunted Palace.

ORDER YOUR COPY OF SON OF UNSUNG HORRORS HERE

For your perusual, I have included a list of every film covered in the book below, plus links to the titles currently available to view on YouTube (although I do stress that to see them in all their glory to hunt down their officially licensed home entertainment release).

If you fancy reading my takes on some of these titles, then just click on the READ MORE links.

The Amazing Mr Blunden
The Black Pit of Dr M
The Black Room
The Black Sleep
The Black Torment
Blind Beast
Blue Eyes of the Broken Doll
The Car
La Casa del Terror
The Case of the Scorpions Tail
Cat O Nine Tails (READ MORE)
Circus of Horrors
The Colossus of New York
Colossus, the Forbin Project
The Corruption of Chris Miller
The Creature Walks Among Us
The Curse of the Mummy’s Tomb
The Deadly Mantis
Death Laid an Egg
The Demoniacs
Demons of the Mind
Destroy All Monsters
The Devil Doll
Dr Black and Mr Hyde
Dr Cyclops (READ MORE)
Dracula (1974) (READ MORE)
Dracula AD 1972
The Earth Dies Screaming
Exorcist II
Female Vampire
The Final Programme (READ MORE)
First Man Into Space (READ MORE)
Flesh and the Fiends
Frankenstein: The True Story (READ MORE)
Frisson du Vampire
Le Ghost
The Ghost Galleon
The Ghost of Rashomon Hall
The Ghost Ship
Ghost Story
The Grip of the Strangler
The Haunted Palace (READ MORE)
Hausu (READ MORE)
He Who Gets Slapped
The Hidden Hand
Horrors of Malformed Men
House of Dark Shadows
House of Dracula
House of the Damned
Hunchback of Notre Dame
The Hyena of London
I Married a Monster
I, Monster
I Vampiri
The Island
The Island of Dr Moreau
Island of Terror
The Killer Reserved 9 Seats
King Kong
King Kong Escapes
The Last Wave
Let’s Scare Jessica to Death
The Long Night of Veronique
Long Weekend
Mad Love
Madhouse
The Magician
Man of a Thousand Faces
Man Who Could Cheat Death
Man Who Haunted Himself (READ MORE)
The Man Who Laughs
Maniac Mansion
The Manitou
Maria Marten
Mark of the Wolfman
The Medusa Touch (READ MORE)
The Mole People
The Monster
Mr Sardonicus
The Mystery of Edwin Drood
The Night Monster
Night My Number Came Up
Night of the Bloody Apes
Night of the Eagle
Night of the Lepus
Nightwing
No Blade of Grass
L’Ossessa
The Phantom of Crestwood
Phase IV
Phantom of Hollywood
Phantom of the Rue Morgue
Picnic at Hanging Rock (READ MORE)
The Pit (READ MORE)
The Power
Requiem for a Vampire
El Retorno El Hombre Lobo
Schlock
7 Faces of Dr Lao
Sh! The Octopus
Soul of a Monster
The Spectre of Edgar Allan Poe
The Swarm
Targets
The 10th Victim (READ MORE)
Theatre of Death
Time After Time
The Tingler
Torture Garden
Tower of London (1939) (READ MORE)
The Velvet Vampire
When Dinosaurs Ruled the Earth
White Reindeer
The Wolfen

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

A Celebration of Peter Cushing | A 300-page love letter to the Gentleman of Horror

From the team behind 70s Monster Memories, Unsung Horrors and We Belong Dead magazine, comes this 300-page love letter to the Gentleman of Horror, Peter Cushing.

Featuring contributions from a global roster of established writers and dedicated fans – A Celebration of Peter Cushing covers the versatile actor’s most famous roles, including the Baron in Hammer’s Frankenstein series and Van Helsing in the studio’s Dracula franchise, as well as his portrayals as Sherlock Holmes, Doctor Who and Star Wars’ Grand Moff Tarkin, plus his memorable roles in a host of genre hits – and misses. There are also lots of chapters dedicated to Cushing’s legacy, in print, on stage, radio and vinyl, and in art; as well as features on his hobbies and his muse, his beloved wife Helen.

A true labour of love, gorgeously designed (with a retro eye) with full colour spreads boasting fantastic photos, posters and lobby cards; a foreward from Hammer scream queen-turned-artist Veronica Carlon; an interview with Cushing’s personal secretary Joyce Broughton; and an archival one from the great man himself, this another must-have for any serious film buff.

ORDER NOW BY CLICKING THIS LINK

Save

Save

Save

Amicus: The Friendly Face of Fear | The untold story of the iconic British film company

Amicus: The Friendly Face of Fear

Amicus – The Friendly Face of Fear tells the complete story of the independent UK film production company’s 20-year creative period, starting with 1950s rock musicals and charting its rise through the two big-screen Dr Who movies, sci-fi favourites (Scream and Scream Again), classic horror anthologies (Tales from the Crypt) and prehistoric fantasies (The Land That Time Forgot).

Back in 2000, the Dark Side Magazine‘s editor Allan Bryce brought out the 163-page paperback, Amicus: The Studio That Dripped Blood, which fetches between £50 and £140.00 on Amazon. But despite it being a collector’s item, it actually left out the true story. This new book sets the record straight by revealing the behind-the-scenes troubles that eventually tore the company apart, leading to a bitter and extended legal battle between the iconic film companies two former partners – Milton Subotsky and Max Rosenberg.

Amicus: The Friendly Face of Fear

Fully illustrated with never-before-published stills, posters, lobby cards, flyers, candid photographs and unused artwork, its something that film fans like myself have been waiting for, for a very long time.

With the new 4k restoration release from Arrow Video of The City of the Dead out now (that atmospheric 1960 horror was produced by Subtosky and Rosenberg produced and led to the creation of Amicus Production), then this well-researched new tome makes for the perfect crypt-side companion.

ORDER HERE: http://amzn.to/2fvSMiR

Amicus: The Friendly Face of FearHOW MANY OF THESE AMICUS CLASSICS HAVE YOU SEEN?
It’s Trad, Dad! (1962)
Just for Fun (1963)
Dr Terror’s House of Horrors (1965)
Dr Who and the Daleks (1965)
The Skull (1965)
Daleks – Invasion Earth: 2150 AD (1966)
The Psychopath (1966)
The Deadly Bees (1966)
Torture Garden (1967)
Danger Route (1967)
They Came from Beyond Space (1967)
The Terrornauts (1967)
A Touch of Love (1969)
The Mind of Mr Soames (1969)
The House That Dripped Blood (1970)
I, Monster (1971)
What Became of Jack and Jill? (1971)
Asylum (1972)
Tales from the Crypt (1972)
The Vault of Horror (1973)
And Now the Screaming Starts! (1973)
From Beyond the Grave (1974)
Madhouse (1974)
The Beast Must Die (1974)
The Land That Time Forgot (1974)
At the Earth’s Core (1976)
The People That Time Forgot (1977)

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

The Dark Heart of Cinema – FrightFest Guide to Exploitation | Pick up your copy at this weekend

The Dark Heart of Cinema - FrightFest Guide to Exploitation

Now here’s something to add to anyone’s horror reference library, and it comes from FAB Press and FrightFest’s Alan Jones…. The Dark Heart of Cinema – FrightFest Guide to Exploitation.

Featuring eye-popping posters, lurid lobby cards, OTT advertising, and witty editorial on 200 wonderfully trashy titles covering all manner of X-ploitation subgenres from 1935 to 1985, this A-Z volume is the first in what could become an annual publication – and I for one hope so. It’s a great size and length (unlike FAB’s weighty but equally covetable An Act of Seeing), and even boasts an intro from Combat Shock director Buddy Giovinazzo.

Ahead of its proper release on 16 September, you can bag yourself a copy if you pop into the Shepherd’s Bush Vue cinema where FrightFest is now underway over the Bank Holiday weekend. And if you can catch him between screenings, you can even get Alan to sign it for you.

Visit the FrightFest and FAB Press websites for more info.

In the meantime, here’s a sample of what lurks beneath the covers….

The Dark Heart of Cinema - FrightFest Guide to Exploitation

%d bloggers like this: