Category Archives: British Film

Asylum | Amicus’ chilling compendium of terror heads to Blu-ray

A year on from releasing The House That Dripped Blood (in February 1971), Amcius brought their latest horror anthology Asylum to UK screens in July 1972.

Written by Robert Bloch and directed by Roy Ward Baker, Asylum sees Robert Powell playing a doctor who undergoes a bizarre job interview for a position at a secluded asylum for the incurably insane. He must prove himself by listening to the macabre tales of four inmates to determine which is the former head of the institute who experienced a breakdown.

In Frozen Fear, Barbara Parkins relates a grisly plot to murder the wealthy wife (Sylvia Syms) of her lover (Richard Todd); The Weird Tailor sees Barry Morse stealing a suit from Peter Cushing that has power of reanimation; Charlotte Rampling is trapped by her imagination when Britt Ekland’s Lucy Comes to Stay; and Herbert Lom plots to transfer his soul into a tiny automaton in Mannikins of Horror.

Following its Limited Edition Blu-ray release last July, this chilling compendium of terror is now out as a standalone Blu-ray from Second Sight Films and includes the following special features…

• Audio Commentary with director Roy Ward Baker and camera operator Neil Binney
• Two’s a Company: 1972 on-set BBC report featuring interviews with producer Milton Subotsky, director Roy Ward Baker, actors Charlotte Rampling, James Villiers and Megs Jenkins, art director Tony Curtis and production manager Teresa Bolland
• Screenwriter David J. Schow on writer Robert Bloch
• Fiona Subotsky remembers Milton Subotsky
• Inside The Fear Factory: Archieve featurette with directors Roy Ward Baker, Freddie Francis and producer Max J Rosenberg
• Theatrical trailer
• Reversible sleeve featuring new artwork by Graham Humphreys and original artwork
• SDH English subtitles for the hard of hearing

 

The House That Dripped Blood | The Amicus anthology horror UK Blu-ray is out now!

Seminal 1971 Amicus horror The House That Dripped Blood, from Peter Duffell in his directorial debut and written by renowned screenwriter Robert Bloch (Psycho), is a star-studded anthology and its out now in the UK as a stand-alone Blu-ray from Second Fight Films.

Scotland Yard’s Inspector Holloway (John Bennett) investigates an old mansion with a ghoulish history and a chilling fate for its occupants in these four tales of terror…

Method for Murder stars Denholm Elliott as a writer whose latest character seeminly comes to life; Peter Cushing and Joss Ackland are haunted by a lost love in Waxworks; Christopher Lee fears his daughter (Chloe Franks) is a witch in Sweets to the Sweet; and The Cloak finds Jon Pertwee playing a horror star who starts turning into a vampire when he buys a vintage cloak from a mysterious antique shop owner (Geoffrey Bayldon).

Following its limited edition Blu-ray release last June, Second Sight have now released The House That Dripped Blood as a standalone Blu-ray with the following special features…

• Audio commentary with director Peter Duffell and author Jonathan Rigby
• Audio commentary with film historian and author Troy Howarth
• Interview with second assistant director Mike Higgins
A-Rated Horror Film: Vintage featurette featuring interviews with Peter Duffell and actors Geoffrey Bayldon, Ingrid Pitt and Chloe Franks
• Theatrical trailers
• Amicus radio spots
• Stills gallery
• Reversible sleeve featuring new artwork by Graham Humphreys
• SDH English subtitles for the hard of hearing

If you want to read more about the film, and its colourful costuming, check out my original post: https://kultguyskeep.wordpress.com/2019/07/29/the-house-that-dripped-blood-claret-and-colourful-cravats/

The Amazing Mr Blunden (1972) | The classic children’s ghost story gets a restored release on Blu-ray

After a First World War widow (Dorothy Alison) moves her family from the slums of Camden, London into a derelict Home Counties mansion, her children Lucy (Lynne Frederick) and Jamie (Garry Miller) are visited by the ghosts of two children – Sara (The Devil Rides Out’s Rosalyn Landor) and Georgie (Marc Granger) – who relate their tragic deaths at the hands of their abusive guardians 100 years ago.

They also encounter the spirit of lawyer Mr Blunden (Jeffries), who feels responsible for the children’s deaths. With the aid of a time-travel potion, Lucy and Jamie return to 1818 where they attempt to stop their uncle’s alcoholic mother-in-law, Mrs Wickens (Diana Dors), from succeeding in doing away with Sara and Georgie for their inheritance.

Adapted from Antonia Barber’s 1969 novel The Ghosts by director Lionel Jeffries (who previously helmed The Railway Children), 1972’s The Amazing Mr Blunden arrives in a stunning collector’s edition from Second Sight, with a brand-new scan and restoration, and a host of special features. It also includes Barber’s original out-of-print source novel exclusively reproduced for this release.

Part-pantomime, part-Dickensian drama, where humour and sadness intertwine superbly, this is an enchanting children’s ghost story that well deserves a revisit. While all the child actors are totally on form, James Villers is delightfully nasty as the dissolute uncle and Madeline Smith is hilariously dotty as the musical hall singer he falls for. But the stand-out is Diana Dors, who totally owns her villainous role as the wicked Mrs Wickens.

SPECIAL FEATURES:
• New scan and restoration
• Audio commentary with actors Madeline Smith, Rosalyn Landor, Stuart Lock and Marc Granger
• Interviews with Madeline Smith and Rosalyn Landor
• Mark Gatiss on The Amazing Mr Blunden
• 2014 archive BFI Q&A with Madeline Smith, Rosalyn Landor and Stuart Lock
• Reversible sleeve with new artwork by Rich Davies and original artwork
The Ghosts the original out-of-print source novel by Antonia Barber
• Rigid slipcase with new artwork by Rich Davies
• Soft cover book with new essays by Kevin Lyons and Kim Newman
• Reversible sleeve with new and original artwork

Hammer Volume Four: Faces of Fear | Four classic chillers arrive on Blu-ray for the very first time in the UK

Four classic Hammer chillers arrive on Blu-ray for the very first time in the UK from Indicator: The Revenge of Frankenstein (1958), The Two Faces of Dr Jekyll (1960), Taste of Fear (1961) and The Damned (1962). Accompanied by a wealth of new and archival extras – including exclusive new documentaries, audio commentaries, alternative versions, new and archival cast and crew interviews, a series of appreciations of their female stars, analyses of their composers’ scores, and extensive booklets – this stunning limited edition box set is strictly limited to 6,000 units. Out on 25 November 2019. Expect some individual reviews very soon.

THE REVENGE OF FRANKENSTEIN (1958)
• New 4K restoration
• Original mono audio
• Audio commentary with film historians Marcus Hearn and Jonathan Rigby (2019)
• Audio commentary with authors Stephen Jones and Kim Newman (2019)
Back from the Dead: Inside The Revenge of Frankenstein (2019, 22 mins): new documentary, featuring Alan Barnes, Kevin Lyons and Jonathan Rigby
• Hammer’s Women: Eunice Gayson (2019, 8 mins): actress profile film historian Pamela Hutchinson
A Frankenstein for the 20th Century (2019, 27 mins): video essay by film historian Kat Ellinger and Dima Ballin
Arpeggios of Melancholy (2019, 13 mins): appreciation of composer Leonard Salzedo’s score by David Huckvale
• Outtakes reel (1958, 12 mins, mute): rare, unseen on-set footage
• Super 8 version (8 mins, b&w, mute): cut-down home cinema presentation
• Original theatrical trailer
• Joe Dante trailer commentary (2013, 2 mins)
• Image gallery
• New and improved English subtitles
• 36-page booklet with essays the film, Hammer’s unrealised Tales of Frankenstein TV series, plus promotional materials and film credits

THE TWO FACES OF DR. JEKYLL (1960)
• High Definition re-master
• Original mono audio
• Audio commentary with film historians Josephine Botting and Jonathan Rigby (2019)
• Identity Crisis: Inside The Two Faces of Dr. Jekyll (2019, 19 mins): documentary, featuring Alan Barnes, Kevin Lyons and Jonathan Rigby
• Hammer’s Women: Dawn Addams (2019, 11 mins): actress profile by British cinema expert Laura Mayne
• Interview with Paul Massie (1967, 10 mins): archival audio recording
Now and Then: Wolf Mankowitz (1968, 28 mins): archival interview
Mauve Decadence (2019, 11 mins): appreciation of composer Monty Norman’s score by David Huckvale
The Many Faces of Dr. Jekyll (2019, 7 mins): an overview of the film’s censorship history
• Original theatrical trailer
• Sam Hamm trailer commentary (2013, 3 mins): short critical appreciation
• Image gallery
• New and improved English subtitles
• 36-page booklet with essays, promotional materials, reviews, and film credits

TASTE OF FEAR (1961)
• High Definition re-master
• Original mono audio
• Two presentations of the film: Taste of Fear, with the rarely seen original UK title sequence, and Scream of Fear, with the alternative US titles
• Audio commentary with Kevin Lyons
Body Horror: Inside Taste of Fear (2019, 23 mins): documentary, featuring Alan Barnes, Kevin Lyons and Jonathan Rigby
• Hammer’s Women: Ann Todd (2019, 12 mins): actress profile by Melanie Williams
• The BFI Southbank Interview with Jimmy Sangster (2008, 68 mins): archival audio recording
• The BEHP Video Interview with Jimmy Sangster (2008, 117 mins): archival video recording
• The BEHP Interview with Douglas Slocombe, Part Two: From Hammer to Spielberg (1988, 82 mins): archival audio recording
Fear Makers (2019, 9 mins): interviews with camera operator Desmond Davis and assistant sound editor John Crome
Anxiety and Terror (2019, 25 mins): appreciation of Clifton Parker’s score by David Huckvale
• Super 8 version of Scream of Fear (20 mins): original cut-down home cinema presentation
• Original US theatrical trailer
• Sam Hamm trailer commentary (2013, 2 mins): short critical appreciation
• Image gallery
• New and improved English subtitles
• 36-page booklet with essays, an archival on-set report, promotional materials, reviews, and film credits

THE DAMNED (1962)
• 2K restoration
• Original mono audio
• Alternative presentations of the complete 96-minute version, playable as either The Damned or These Are the Damned
• Box-set exclusive presentation of the rarely seen original 87-minute UK theatrical cut of The Damned
• Audio commentary with film historians Kat Ellinger and Samm Deighan
On the Brink: Inside The Damned (2019, 27 mins): documentary, featuring Alan Barnes, Kevin Lyons, Nick Riddle and Jonathan Rigby
• Hammer’s Women: Viveca Lindfors (2019, 15 mins): profile by film historian Lindsay Hallam
Looking in the Right Place (2019, 10 mins): actor Shirley Anne Field on working with Oliver Reed and Joseph Losey
Children of The Damned (2019, 24 mins): interview with David Palmer, Kit Williams and Christopher Witty
Something Out of Nothing (2019, 7 mins): interview with screenwriter Evan Jones
Smoke Screen (2019, 12 mins): interview with camera operator Anthony Heller
Beneath the Surface (2019, 26 mins): interview with filmmaker Gavrik Losey, son of director Joseph Losey
Beyond Black Leather (2019, 15 mins): academic IQ Hunter discusses The Damned
No Future (2019, 26 mins): appreciation by author and film historian Neil Sinyard
The Lonely Shore (2019, 21 mins): appreciation of James Bernard’s score by David Huckvale
• Isolated music & effects track
• Original US theatrical trailer
• Joe Dante trailer commentary (2013, 4 mins)
• Image gallery
• New and improved English subtitles
• 36-page booklet, includes Joseph Losey on The Damned, a look at the US pressbook, reviews, and film credits

The System (1964) | Michael Winner’s dark drama starring Oliver Reed on Blu-ray

From Indicator comes the limited edition World Blu-ray premiere of Michael Winner’s 1964 drama, The System.

The first film on which star Oliver Reed and director Michael Winner collaborated (they later made The Jokers, I’ll Never Forget What’s ‘Is Name and Hannibal Brooks ), this is a bitter little essay on class and youth that deserves more recognition.

Reed plays Tinker, a photographer based in the fictional Devon seaside town of Roxham who, each summer, passes on the names of holidaymakers and local lasses to his out-of-towner mates – for a fee, of course. It’s all a bit of harmless fun, but his system turns sour when he tries to woo Nicola (Jane Merrow), the daughter of a wealthy local businessman…

Making great use of the coastal locations (including Brixham Harbour, Paignton Beach and Torquay) and gloriously shot (in black and white) by Nicolas Roeg, The System features a plethora of embryonic British talent, including John Alderton, Derek Nimmo and David Hemmings – who all looking incredibly slim and youthful, while Harry Andrews turns in a powerful character study as a surly photo-shop owner. Reed is perfectly cast here as the ‘Girl-Getters’ leader, and imbues his Tinker with great depth (plus a bit of own notoriously wild personality); while Jane Merrow brings an icy coolness to her fiercely independent heroine that will make you sit up a take notice.

On a trivia note, it was this film that first popularised the word ‘grockle’ – West Country slang for a tourist; and ‘boy!’ do screenwriter Peter Draper and director Michael Winner have great fun taking the mickey out of the stereotypes of the day (who favoured baggy clothing with handkerchiefs on their heads). Randall and Hopkirk (Deceased)’s Mike Pratt wrote the catchy theme tune, which is sung by the Merseybeat combo, The Searchers. Winner’s previous film before this was West 11 (read my review here).

SPECIAL FEATURES:
• High Definition remaster
• Original mono audio
• Audio commentary with film historians Thirza Wakefield and Melanie Williams
Getting the Girl (2019, 18 mins): interview with actor Jane Merrow
Drinking and Dancing (2019, 6 mins): interview with actor John Porter-Davison
Fun and Games (2019, 4 mins): interview with actor Jeremy Burnham
Haunted England (1961, 24 mins): Winner’s Eastmancolor travelogue about stately homes and other famous places with ghostly tales to tell, hosted by broadcaster David Jacobs
• Image gallery
• New and improved English subtitles
• Collector’s booklet with essays on the film and Haunted England, contemporary critical responses, and film credits.

 

 

They Made Me a Fugitive | The 1947 British film noir starring Trevor Howard and Sally Gray on Blu-ray

This 1947 British crime thriller (which was called I Became a Criminal in the US) was pretty brutal in its day. Trevor Howard plays Clem Morgan, a RAF officer tempted into the underground world of black-marketeering on demob and ultimately helped by Sally, the discarded mistress of his psychopathic gangland boss (Griffith Jones). She’s played by Sally Gray, just then returned to movie-making following a five-year rest after suffering a breakdown due to pressure of work. Most striking here, Gray would go on to make four more sterling melodramas before retiring in 1952 following her marriage to Dominick Browne, the 4th Baron Oranmore and Browne.

The film’s gritty, poetic urban realism is justly realised by Brazilian-born director Alberto Cavalcanti (credited as Cavalcanti here) who had spent seven years at the British GPO Unit working on documentary projects like 1937’s Night Mail, before joining Ealing Studios where he helmed the first sound screen adaptation of the Dickens novel Nicholas Nickleby and co-directed the horror anthology classic Dead of Night (1945). The striking noir cinematography (of Crabtree Lane in Fulham, Limehouse and Dartmoor) is by Otto Heller, whose later credits would include Peeping Tom (1960) and The Ipcress File (1965).

Indicator’s UK Blu-ray premiere of They Made Me a Fugitive is accompanied by two rare short films, made during Howard’s own time in the RAF during WWII, and the following special features.

SPECIAL FEATURES:
• 2K restoration by the British Film Institute
• Original mono audio
• The John Player Lecture with Alberto Cavalcanti (1970, 62 mins): archival audio recording of the celebrated director at London’s National Film Theatre, including an audience Q&A with fellow filmmakers Michael Balcon, Paul Rotha and Basil Wright
After Effects (2019, 29 mins): appreciation by author and film historian Neil Sinyard
About the Restoration (2019, 14 mins): the BFI’s Kieron Webb discusses the process of restoring the film
Squaring the Circle (1941, 33 mins): dramatised Royal Air Force training film, starring Trevor Howard in his first known film role
The Aircraft Rocket (1944, 9 mins): extract from a multi-part RAF technical film, featuring Howard
• Image gallery
• New and improved English subtitles
• Collector’s booklet with a new essay by Nathalie Morris, extracts from Cavalcanti’s Film and Reality, a 1970 article on Cavalcanti by Geoffrey Minish, an overview of contemporary critical responses, Anthony Nield on the wartime films of Trevor Howard, and film credits

Kaleidoscope | The Jones brothers’ psychological thriller will hold you captive!

Lonely ex-con Carl Woods (Toby Jones) is trying to find his way back in the world after a stint inside (jail). He’s got himself a council flat in a Brutalist block of flats, has a kindly neighbour Monique (Cecilia Noble) who is looking out for him, and is eager to have his first date in years with Abby (Sinead Matthews), who he has just met online. But one morning, he wakes to a shocking discovery – Abby’s dead corpse on his bathroom room. As he desperately tries to recall what happened, his estranged mother (Anne Reid) suddenly arrives – and she has no intention of leaving…

Toby Jones is one of Britain’s most outstanding actors in the UK and he gives a bravo turn in his brother Rupert’s 2017 debut film debut, a nightmarish psychological thriller that will hold you captivate throughout. ‘National Treasure’ Anne Reid also delivers a nuanced performance as the slightly sinister mother, who may or may not have a history of incest with her son, and there’s certainly more than meets the eye when it comes to Sinead Matthews’ character.

This intense thriller has been described as paying homage to Hitchcock, but it’s structure, themes and single setting actually evoke Polanski’s claustrophobic psychological classics, Repulsion and The Tenant, which both featured a silent, isolated observer in hiding, while the film’s setting also chimes with Polanski’s recurring motif of the horror of the apartment space. The modernist estate in Hackney, East London where the film was shot features an eleven-storey staircases which becomes a key visual metaphor for the film’s many twists and turns.

Now I don’t want to give anything away, but it’s not too much of a spoiler to say that everything you are about to witness is all seen through the distorted prism of Carl’s broken mind. Just how the reality-bender narrative plays out is best seen for yourself.

Kaleidoscope is available now on UK digital platforms and DVD.

DID YOU KNOW?
The Hackney estate seen in the film was designed by Skinner, Bailey & Lubetkin and completed in 1957. It includes two Y-shaped eleven-storey blocks, George Loveless House and James Hammett House, and the lower-rise James Brine House, Robert Owen House and Arthur Wade House, which were all named after the Tolpuddle Martyrs. The location can also be seen in 2015’s Legend, in which Tom Hardy played both Ron and Reggie Kray, and in Alfonso Cuaron’s 2006 dystopian sci-fi Children of Men, where it was turned into a refugee camp.

The Legacy | The 1978 occult chiller gets a UK Blu-ray premiere

This 1978 British horror from Return of the Jedi director Richard Marquand fuses that mystery staple, the old dark house – seen in many a classic, including James Whale’s 1932 whodunit and the long-running Agatha Christie play on London’s West End, The Mousetrap – with the in-vogue satanic frighteners of the day like The Omen and Race With the Devil.

The Legacy (1978)

Katharine Ross and Sam Elliott (who later married after meeting on the set) play an American couple who become reluctant guests at the English country mansion of a dying Satanist (John Standing) who believes Ross to be the reincarnation of an ancestor and next in line to head his powerful cult. But standing in her way are five house guests, who soon meet with spectacular deaths including drowning, burning, impaling and a botched tracheotomy.

The Legacy (1978)

The cast boasts some famous faces, including The Who’s Roger Daltrey, playing a music impresario – of course; Charles Gray (still my favourite Blofeld) as a weapons dealer; and West End actress Margaret Tyzack (who’d go on to play Bianca and Ricky’s gran in EastEnders) as a nurse who can turn herself into a white cat.

The Legacy (1978)

With its themes of reincarnation, possession and telekinesis, The Legacy – which was written by the legendary Jimmy Sangster – follows in the wake of other occult-themed films like The Omen and Suspiria, and was very much inspired by them. While it’s no masterpiece, and didn’t catch the box-office alight – unlike Gray’s character, it’s still a stylish exercise in suspense with some decent special effects, crisp autumnal photography by Dick Bush and Alan Hume, and an ‘eccentric’ score from Theatre of Blood composer Michael J Lewis, who also wrote the annoying theme tune, Another Side of Me (sung by Kiki Dee).

Today you can visit the film’s main location, Loseley Manor in Surrey, as the house and gardens are open to the public all year round. But if you do, watch out for any suspicious-looking nurses lurking about. Meanwhile, the village scenes were shot in Hambleden, Bucks – which has been used for huge number of films and TV shows, from Chitty Chitty Bang Bang to Good Omens.

The Legacy (1978)

The Indicator Limited Edition Blu-ray (UK premiere) is available from 29 July and includes the following special features…

• The UK theatrical cut, presented open matte from a Standard Definition master (102 mins): The film was released in UK cinemas in September 1978.
• The US theatrical cut, presented in widescreen from a High Definition master (100 mins): The film was released in the US in 1979, with a shorter runtime and some alternative shots
• Original stereo audio
An Extended Legacy (2019, 11 mins): an analysis of the differences between the US and UK cuts (This is found in the Play sub-menu): There 13 instances of unique footage across the two version – 12 in the UK cut and 1 in the UK cut.
• Audio commentary with Kevin Lyons, editor of The Encyclopedia of Fantastic Film and Television website (I thoroughly enjoyed this, especially when Kevin discusses the filming locations and compares the screenplay with the the film’s paperback tie-in – which I have – and yes, I did go straight to page 183 to find out more about Charles Gray’s gruesome death)
An Editing Legacy (2015, 14 mins): editor and second unit director Anne V Coates recalls her work on the film (this one is ported over from the Scream Factory release)
The Make-up Effects of The Legacy (2015, 11 mins): Robin Grantham on his make-up creations for the film, including that squrim-inducing tracheotomy (also ported over from Scream Factory)
Ashes and Crashes (2019, 4 mins): interview with second unit director Joe Marks, who shares his memories of working with the film’s cast and crew (this one was shot for this release)
Between the Anvil and the Hammer (1973, 27 mins): Richard Marquand’s Central Office of Information short about the Liverpool police force (this is a real eye-opener — and an historic step back in time — when it really was grim up North)
• Theatrical trailer
• Image gallery
• Collector’s booklet with a new essay by Julian Upton, an archival location report, Jimmy Sangster on The Legacy, extracts from the novelisation, an overview of critical responses, an introduction to Between the Anvil and the Hammer, and film credits

 

Scum | Alan Clarke’s brutal borstal drama still shocks 40 years on!

After the banning of their original 1977 BBC TV version, director Alan Clarke (The Firm) and writer Roy Minton (Funny Farm) set out to remake their drama, Scum. The resulting film, released now in a special UK Blu-ray edition to mark its 40th anniversary, was an even more vitriolic portrait of a corrupt and violent institution which stunned cinema audiences and caused outrage…

Scum (1979)

IN BORSTAL SURVIVAL RULES!
Young offenders Carlin (Ray Winstone), Angel (Alrick Riley) and Davis (Julian Firth) are sent to a tough British borstal in the country where they are brutalised by inmates and governors alike. After being singled out by Banks (John Blundell), the existing ‘Daddy’ on his wing, Carlin fights back, rising to the top of the prisoner heap. But for Angel and Davis life behind bars is much harder to take, especially so for Davis who takes his own life after a terrifying gang rape…

Scum (1979)

I’M THE F***ING DADDY NOW!
Roy Minton‘s script lays bare the brutal reality of British borstals, which were intended to reform young offenders, but ended up becoming breeding grounds for the next generation of hardened criminals. From the fire and brimstone governor (Peter Howell), sadistic wing head Mr Sands (John Judd) and his thuggish officers to ineffectual house master Goodyear (John Grillo) and an uncaring matron (Jo Kendall), there is not one sympathetic character amongst the staff in charge of the boys, who are so desperately in need of guidance, understanding and discipline, but end up being treated with brutal force and intimidation.

Set essentially in a boarding school with bars, Clarke’s film evokes the rebellious ‘two-fingers up at the establishment’ spirit of Lindsay Anderson’s If… (1968), and this is perfect captured in the film’s (improvised) riot scene in which the inmates vent their anger in response to Davis’ suicide. There are also shades of A Clockwork Orange in there, especially in Grillo’s greasy house master, who reminded me of Anthony Sharp’s sleazy Minister of the Interior in Kubrick’s film. Cinematically, the film is shot with a documentary flair, while its wintery exterior scenes are reminiscent of the paintings of LS Lowry.

Scum (1979)

Grim and overwhelming in its squalid sense of reality, the film is a fist in the face in terms of its foul language, racial and religious taunts (politically incorrect by today’s standards), graphic violence and male rape scene, while the acting from the young cast, including future famous faces like Mick Ford, Phil Daniels and Ray Burdis, is uniformly excellent. 40 years on, Scum still resonates (the snooker ball in a sock scene is iconic). But how much has really changed with regards to how we treat our young offenders?

The Indicator Limited Edition Blu-ray release includes the following special features…

• 2K restoration from the original negative, newly re-graded and approved by director of photography Phil Méheux
• Original mono audio
• Audio commentary with actor Ray Winstone and film critic Nigel Floyd (2006)
No Luxuries (2019, 20 mins): actor Mick Ford looks at his character of Archer
An Outbreak of Acting (2019, 16 mins): actor Ray Burdis on returning to the role of Eckersley for the feature film
Smashing Windows (2019, 12 mins): actor Perry Benson recalls the daily experiences of being on set
Continuous Tension (2019, 18 mins): director of photography Phil Méheux analyses the documentary approach of his cinematography
Criminal Record (2019, 10 mins): associate producer Martin Campbell on remaking the banned teleplay for the big screen
Back to Borstal (2019, 32 mins): executive producer Don Boyd reflects on his efforts to reinvigorate British cinema in the late 1970s
Concealing the Art (2019, 30 mins): veteran editor Michael Bradsell recalls collaborating with Alan Clarke
That Kind of Casting (2019, 22 mins): casting director Esta Charkham on the influence the Anna Scher Theatre had on production
• Interview with Roy Minton and Clive Parsons (1999, 16 mins)
• Interview with Roy Minton (2005, 20 mins)
• Interview with Davina Belling and Clive Parsons (2005, 9 mins)
• Interview with Don Boyd (2005, 13 mins)
• Cast Memories (2005, 17 mins): archive interviews with Phil Daniels, Julian Firth, Mick Ford and David Threlfall
• Original ‘U’ and ‘X’ certificate theatrical trailers
• Image gallery
• New and improved English subtitles
• Limited edition collector’s book
• Limited edition exclusive double-sided poster

Two classic Amicus horror anthologies, The House That Dripped Blood & Asylum, get a limited edition UK Blu-ray release

On 29 July 2019, Second Sight Films will release Limited Edition UK Blu-ray releases of the Amicus horror anthologies – The House That Dripped Blood and Asylum. Each release will be presented in a stunning box set featuring original artwork from Graham Humphreys alongside a host of special features, including essays from horror aficionados and a collector’s booklet.

Written by Robert Bloch, 1971’s The House That Dripped Blood sees Denholm Elliott, Peter Cushing, Christopher Lee, Jon Pertwee and Ingrid Pitt taking centre stage in four tales of terror that unfold as a Scotland Yard’s Inspector Holloway investigates a mysterious mansion with a ghoulish history and a chilling fate for its occupants…

SPECIAL FEATURES
• Audio commentary with director Peter Duffell and author Jonathan Rigby
• Audio commentary with film historian and author Troy Howarth
• Interview with Second Assistant director Mike Higgins
A Rated Horror Film: Vintage featurette featuring interviews with director Peter Duffell and 
actors Geoffrey Bayldon, Ingrid Pitt and Chloe Franks
• Theatrical Trailers
• Radio Spots
• Stills Gallery
• Reversible sleeve featuring new artwork by Graham Humphreys and original artwork

PRE-ORDER NOW FROM AMAZON

Directed by Roy Ward Baker from another scare-tastic screenplay from Robert Bloch, 1972’s Asylum sees Robert Powell playing a young doctor attending a job interview at a secluded asylum for the incurably insane, where he hears the macabre stories of four inmates to determine which is the former head of the asylum. The all-star cast includes Peter Cushing, Charlotte Rampling, Britt Ekland, Herbert Lom, Barbara Parkins and Patrick Magee.

SPECIAL FEATURES
• Audio commentary with director Roy Ward Baker and camera operator Neil Binney
Two’s a Company: 1972 On-set BBC report featuring interviews with producer Milton 
Subotsky, director Roy Ward Baker, actors Charlotte Rampling, James Villiers, Megs Jenkins, 
Art Director Tony Curtis and production manager Teresa Bolland
• Screenwriter David J Schow on Robert Bloch
• Fiona Subotsky Remembers Milton
Inside The Fear Factory: Featurette with directors Roy Ward Baker, Freddie Francis and 
producer Max J Rosenberg
• Theatrical Trailer
• Reversible sleeve featuring new artwork by Graham Humphreys and original artwork

PRE-ORDER NOW FROM AMAZON

LIMITED EDITION CONTENTS FOR EACH RELEASE
• Rigid slipcase featuring new artwork by Graham Humphreys
• 40 page booklet with new essays by Allan Bryce, Jon Towlson and Kat Ellinger
• Reversible poster featuring new and original artwork

 

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