Category Archives: World Cinema

Belle de Jour (1967) | Luis Buñuel’s exquisite exploration of female desire gets a 50th anniversary 4k restoration release

Belle de Jour (1967)

From Studiocanal comes the newly-restored 4k version of director Luis Buñuel’s Belle de Jour (1967) starring Catherine Deneuve, Jean Sorel and Michel Piccoli.

Belle de Jour (1967)

Séverine (Catherine Deneuve), the reserved wife of successful Parisian surgeon Pierre (Jean Sorel), is prone to masochistic fantasies which reveal her sexual frustration. Driven by a mixture of ennui and curiosity, she pays a visit to a brothel run by Madame Anaïs (Geneviève Page), where she begins to work there during the day under the name Belle de Jour.

Seemingly having found an inner peace through the satisfaction of her clients’ desires, things soon turn sour when Marcel (Michel Piccoli), a loutish friend of Pierre’s, insists on having Séverine all to himself. Panic-stricken, Séverine quits her dangerous day job but is it too late?

Belle de Jour (1967)

Buñuel blends memory, fantasy and reality, seamlessly, in his surrealistic voyage into the mind of Deneuve’s bored housewife to show the deep mysteries of sex without showing the sex act itself – and it is never certain if what is seen is reality or fantasy.

Sumptuously filmed in and around the streets of Paris (many of which you can still visit today), it is a exquisite exploration of female desire, but the film’s moral tone shocked the notorious British social activist Mary Whitehouse into a vocal campaign against the BBC on its first TV screening.

It was, however, Buñuel’s most successful film of his entire career, winning the Best Picture award at the 1976 Venice Film Festival. A spellbinding must-have for your world cinema collection.

Belle de Jour (1967)

The 50th Anniversary Edition is out now on DVD, Blu-Ray and Digital download with brand new extras material (see below) and 6 exclusive art cards.

SPECIAL FEATURES
• Commentary by professor Peter W Evans
• The Last Script
• A Story of Perversion or Emancipation?
• Interview with Dr Sylvain Mimoun
• NEW Trailer
• NEW Jean-Claude Carrière interview (fascinating stuff)
• NEW Masterclass with Diego Buñuel and Jean-Claude Carrière (also very illuminating)

Belle de Jour (1967)

To accompany the re-issue and to celebrate work of the Spanish surrealist director, Buñuel: The Essential Collection, a box-set of 7 of the director’s most significant films, will be released next week (and I can’t wait).

Luis Bunuel box-set

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Destiny (Der müde Tod) (1921) | Fritz Lang’s expressionist fable of life… and death gets a definitive restored release

Destiny (1921)

Before dazzling audiences with Metropolis, M, and Spione, German director Fritz Lang dabbled with bending cinematic conventions in his 1921 German folksong in six verses, Der müde Tod (literally, The Weary Death).

Destiny (1921)

A young woman (Lil Dagover) confronts the personification of Death (Bernhard Goetzke), in an effort to save the life of her fiancé (Walter Janssen). Death then weaves three romantic tragedies set in Persia, Quattrocento Venice and ancient China, and offers to unite the girl with her lover, if she can prevent the death of the lovers in at least one of the episodes…

Destiny (1921)

Fusing German Romanticism, Orientalism, and Expressionism with evocative expressionist imagery and featuring special effects work never seen before, Der müde Tod has often been overlooked amongst Lang’s early work, but was the springboard for the über-stylised filmmaking that would culminate in such genre-defining masterpieces as Die Nibelungen and Metropolis.

Destiny (1921)

Now in a new 2k restoration, this new presentation of the lost classic preserves the original German intertitles and simulates the historic colour tinting and toning of its initial release, and is accompanied by a newly-composed score by Cornelius Schwehr, which was originally performed by the 70-member Berlin Rundfunk Symphony Orchestra.

Eureka Entertainment is proud present Lang’s classic as part of their Masters of Cinema Series in a definitive Dual Format (Blu-ray & DVD) edition, available from 17 July 2017.

ORDER HERE: http://amzn.to/2kV2YsC

WHAT THE PRESS SAID – IN 1921

‘Based on inwardness and intellectual mastery, this work by author / director Fritz Lang veers off the beaten track of your average movie. It does not seek to stun the senses of the viewer with a huge contingent of people and material, but provides real, inspired art. Individual images surprise us with their picturesque beauty, capturing the essence of the German folk song in its simple sincerity.’ Abendblatt (October 7, 1921)

‘Fact and fiction skilfully interwoven, cheerful and serious moments, much bitter truth, sometimes literature, sometimes Karl May or Munchausen. Just like life itself. And above all love. Only death is more powerful.’ Wolfgang Fischer, Neue Zeit Charlottenburg (October 5, 1921)

‘A new, interesting style of film: the sweeping ballad. Half fairy-tale dream, half reality, carefully crafted.’ Erich Effler, Film und Presse no. 37/38 (1921)

Destiny (1921)

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A Time to Love and a Time to Die (1958) | Douglas Sirk ditches the melodrama to make an anti-war epic

A Time to Love and a Time to Die cover
During the last days of World War Two, a young German soldier (John Gavin) stationed on the Eastern Front becomes bitterly disillusioned with the war and the Nazi ’cause’ when he returns to his village, finding his love destroyed and his parents missing.

A Time to Love and a Time to Die cover
Douglas Sirk, best known for his lush 1950s Hollywood melodramas, directs a moving love story within the context of a fiercely anti-war film, based on a novel by All Quiet on the Western Front author Erich Maria Remarque.

A far cry from the soapy high camp of All That Heaven Allows or Written on the Wind, Sirk’s CinemaScope epic, A Time to Love and A Time to Die (which was originally released on 9 July 1958)  is an explosive and unforgettable experience and is rightly regarded as his masterpiece, counting New Wave director Jean-Luc Godard among its fans.

A Time to Love and a Time to Die cover
In 2009 Eureka Entertainment released the 1958 war-time drama on DVD, followed by the Blu-ray in 2013 – as part of its The Masters of Cinema Series – in its original 2:35:1 CinemaScope aspect ratio, with English SDH subtitles, optional isolated music and effects track.

The extras include, Of Tears and Speed: According to Jean-Luc Godard, a 12-minute, visually annotated recitation of Godard’s seminal essay on Sirk’s film; a 19-minute video interview with screenwriter Wesley Strick; Imitation of Life [Mirage of Life]: A Portrait of Douglas Sirk, a 49-minute documentary from 1984; trailer and collector’s booklet.

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Death in the Garden (1956) | Luis Buñuel’s rebellious rumble in the jungle is a surrealist tour de force

Death in the Garden (1956)

From Eureka Entertainment comes Death in the Garden, Luis Buñuel’s surreal adventure film, as part of The Masters of Cinema Series, in a Dual-format (Blu-ray & DVD) edition.

After his colourful 1954 rumble in the jungle with Adventures of Robinson Crusoe (which scored star Dan O’Herlihy a Best Actor Oscar nod), Luis Buñuel adapted José-André Lacour’s novel La mort en ce jardin for the second in his revolutionary triptych exploring the morality and tactics of armed revolution against a right-wing dictatorship. The first was 1956’s Cela s’appelle l’aurore and the last being 1959’s La Fièvre Monte à El Pao.

Death in the Garden (1956)

The action takes place in an unspecified South American outpost where martial law is declared following a miners revolt. Fearing for their lives, rugged adventurer Shark (Georges Marchal), French prostitute Djin (Simone Signoret), dedicated priest Father Lizardi (Michel Piccoli), veteran diamond miner Castin (Charles Vanel), and his deaf-mute daughter Maria (Michèle Girardon), flee into the jungle – but they are unprepared for the dangers that lay ahead…

Death in the Garden (1956)

Death in the Garden (1956)

Death in the Garden is a game of two halves: the first (running around an hour) is pure adventure as the fugitives escape the bloodshed, while the second half sees Buñuel let loose his surreal imaginings and political constructs.

Gorgeously shot in Eastmancolor and making painterly use of the exotic Catemaco and Cosamaloapan locations in Veracruz, Mexico, the film really comes into its own in the jungle with each character undergoing an existential crisis, while Buñuel’s master stroke is the discovery of the wreckage of a passenger plane – the contents of which become symbolic of the bourgeois trappings that our exiles have left behind.

Death in the Garden (1956)

Death in the Garden (1956)

Michel Piccoli (in one of his earliest feature film roles) gets my vote as the film’s stand-out character. His Catholic priest is devout, but also very human; while Georges Marchal makes for a pretty fit action hero, and Simone Signoret is one helluva rough diamond.

This little-seen Buñuel is certainly ripe for rediscovery and a surrealist tour de force.

Available to order from: Amazon http://amzn.to/2oBDNt0

DUAL FORMAT SPECIAL FEATURES:
· 1080p presentation (Blu-ray)
· Uncompressed PCM soundtrack (Blu-ray)
· Optional English subtitles
· Interview with Tony Rayns
· Interview with actor Michel Piccoli
· Interview with film scholar Victor Fuentes
· Masters of Cinema exclusive trailer
· PLUS: A booklet featuring a new essay by Philip Kemp, and archival imagery

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Tenderness of the Wolves (1973) | Rediscover Ulli Lommel’s disturbing German serial killer satire

Tenderness of the Wolves (1973)

From Arrow Video comes the rarely seen early-1970s German serial killer drama, loosely based on the true story of Fritz Haarmann, aka the Butcher of Hanover. Produced by Rainer Werner Fassbinder and directed by Ulli Lommel, Tenderness of the Wolves was originally released on 29 June 1973, and became available on Blu-ray and DVD following a restoration by the Rainer Werner Fassbinder Foundation in November 2015.

Tenderness of the Wolves (1973)

Haarmann was responsible for the murders of 24 boys and young men during the so-called ‘years of crisis’ between the two world wars in the Lower Saxony capital before being executed by the guillotine in 1925. His grisly case partly inspired Fritz Lang’s 1931 classic M (starring Peter Lorre) as well as this near-forgotten gem from 1973, which I have been searching for ever since I read about it an issue of Stephen Thrower’s Eyeball magazine back in 1998.

In a supremely understated performance, a shaven-headed Kurt Raab makes his perverted boy killer a repellent, yet fascinating and (at times) sympathetic figure. He’s also one of cinemas most human monsters. Using his status as a police informant to procure his young victims – mostly runaways and street vagrants, the former petty thief dismembers their bodies, then sells their flesh on the black market to his friends and neighbours.

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While uneasy to watch, Ulli Lommel’s film expertly utilises the true crime thriller genre to let a disturbing socio-political commentary on how poverty creates a climate of indifference to rear its satirical head.

The film’s real horror, meanwhile, is not in the killings (although they are made all the more frightening because they are alluded to rather than shown), but in the in-actions of those who support and nurture a vile creature like Haarman: including the police, his neighbours and lowlife friends (who dare not cast the first stone in case their own darkness comes to light).

And this horror is presented in two chilling scenes: when a store-owner laughs off Haarman eyeing up her young son (knowing full well what he does to them); while another, barely 10, accosts him for sexual favours, but is never seen again after knocking on his door…

Tenderness of the Wolves (1973)

THE 2015 ARROW VIDEO RELEASE
• New high definition digital transfer on Blu-ray DVD, with original uncompressed PCM mono 1.0 sound, and newly translated optional English subtitles
• Audio commentary, interview and introduction by director Ulli Lommel
Photographing Fritz: interview with director of photography Jürgen Jürges
Haarmann’s Victim Talks: interview with actor Rainer Will
• An appreciation by Stephen Thrower
• Gallery
• Trailer (in HD)
• Reversible sleeve featuring artwork by the Twins of Evil
• Collector’s booklet

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Boccaccio ’70 (1962) | Italian sexual mores as seen through the eyes of Fellini, Visconti, De Sica and Monicelli

Boccaccio 70 (1962)

Italy’s greatest directors bring four stories of Italian post-war sexual mores and morality to cinematic life in the 1962 big-screen anthology Boccaccio ’70, which gets a brand-new remaster on Blu-ray, DVD and digital from CultFilms in the UK.

Federico Fellini directs his first colour work, the wild fantasy, Le tentazioni del dottor Antonio, which perfectly illustrates why Fellini is Fellini. Starring Anita Ekberg, who beguiled cinema audiences as the lady in the Trevi Fountain in 1960’s La Dolce Vita, Fellini’s surreal play sees a prudish man driven insane when a giant billboard featuring the ravishing Ekberg comes to life.

Boccaccio 70 (1962)

Luchino Visconti provides some serious melodrama with Il lavoro, a play in which Romy Schneider’s aristocratic housewife shows her independent side when her husband’s affairs make front page news. This one features what Time Magazine described as ‘surely one of the most provocative stripteases to be recorded on film’.

Boccaccio 70 (1962)

Vittorio De Sica’s story, La riffa, sees screen siren Sophia Loren putting her sexual favours up for auction in a bid a to pay off her taxes. While the portraits conclude with director Mario Monicelli’s once lost segment, Renzo e Luciana – a sweet, funny play about two working class lovers (Marisa Solinas and Germano Gilioli) who keep their impending marriage a secret in order to keep their jobs.

With an exciting soundtrack from the legendary Nino Rota and Armando Trovaili and outstanding camerawork, Boccaccio ’70 is a slice of cinematic history past that deserves multiple viewings.

Boccaccio 70 (1962)

For the first-time ever, the film is presented here in both its original language with new, improved, English subtitles and alternatively with an English audio track. The new Blu-ray release also features previously the unseen documentary, Sophia, Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow, a candid, intimate interview with Sophia Loren with contributions from Woody Allen, Giorgio Armani and other close friends and collaborators.

Boccaccio ’70 is available on Blu-ray, DVD and digital from CultFilms in the UK from 26 June 2017

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Diabolique (1955) | The Criterion Collection releases the mother of all shockers in HD

Diabolique (1955)

Director Henri-Georges Clouzot’s 1955 French thriller Les Diaboliques (shortened to Diabolique in this Criterion Collection release) without doubt one of the finest whodunits ever made in the history of cinema and regarded by critics and fans alike as Europe’s answer to Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho (released five years later). It is, in my books, the mother of all shockers!

Véra Clouzot (the director’s wife) plays Cristiana (aka Cri Cri), the much put-upon wife of a sadistic boarding school head Michel (Paul Meurisse), who is coerced by his mistress Nicole (a tough, forbidding Simone Signoret in one of her best ever roles) into killing him and dumping his body in the school’s swimming pool. But when the pool is later drained, there’s no body and so the mystery begins.

Armed with a hotel key, found on the suit Michel was wearing the night he was killed, Christina begins her own investigation. But she, and Nicole, haven’t countered on the tenacity of a retired detective (Charles Vane) who is determined to prove he’s still got what it takes to solve the crime.

Diabolique (1955)

Even 60+ years after its initial release, this haunting thriller has never lost its potency, nor its ability to shock, thanks to a suspenseful script, carefully constructed pacing and the well-developed lead characters. Christina is so religious that she feels damned by her actions, yet Nicole is her polar opposite. Does she feel some affinity with Christina’s plight or is she preying on Christina’s weaknesses? Watching these two characters play off each other is what makes this film so unforgettable.

Diabolique (1955)

My favourite scenes are when Nicole and Christina put their murderous plan into action. I found myself watching their every move, hoping and praying nothing goes wrong. But of course it does, and – thanks to Clouzot’s eye – we, the audience, become complicit in the women’s actions.

Watch carefully and you will find that water features heavily throughout. The dripping tap, the highly decorative bath and the swimming pool are all symbols of death, best illustrated by a close-up of the bath drain (which Hitchcock would make his own in Psycho) and the emptying of the pool. So potent an image is the pool that it makes me wonder how many other films turn a swimming pool into a character itself.

Diabolique (1955)

Diabolique is a heart-grabbing benchmark in horror film-making and is a must-have for all world cinema fans. Back in 2011, a dual format UK release from Arrow Academy featured a HD transfer of the film from a new restoration of the original negative. Now, The Criterion Collection has released a UK Blu-ray version featuring the same digital restoration and the following special features…

• Uncompressed monaural soundtrack
• Selected-scene commentary by French-film scholar Kelley Conway
• New video introduction by Serge Bromberg, codirector of Henri-Georges Clouzot’s “Inferno
• New video interview with novelist and film critic Kim Newman
• Original theatrical trailer
• PLUS: An essay by film critic Terrence Rafferty

 

 

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The Eye of the Storm (2011) | A stylish adaptation of the acclaimed Patrick White novel

Eye of the Storm
In director Fred Schepisi’s 2011 adaptation of the acclaimed 1973 novel by Australian author Patrick White (who was born on this day, 28 May, in 1912), Charlotte Rampling, plays dying Sydney matriarch Elizabeth Hunter, whose final days are being spent in the care of a dotty housekeeper and two no-nonsense nurses.

When her uptight French socialite daughter Dorothy (Judy Davis) and struggling London-based actor son Basil (Geoffrey Rush) arrive and make plans to put her in a home, Elizabeth’s iron will comes to the fore, causing her children to take stock of their lives…

Eye of the Storm
Boasting three captivating performances from Rampling, Rush and Davis and one incredibly poignant one from Helen Morse Lotte, this is a faithful and stylish adaptation of one of White’s most-admired literary works.

Strip away the trappings of wealth and privilege and you’ll find a universal theme here about family and death as Rush and Davis’ siblings desperately seek closure with their mother before she expires, only to discover a hidden depth in the woman whom they blame for their barren lives.

Schepisi’s tauntly constructed drama is a biting yet witty exploration of that journey of redemption and forgiveness, and once you have seen it, it will only make you reach out for the original source novel again.

Out on DVD in the UK from Munro Films

 

 

 

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Phenomena (1985) | The definitive release of Dario Argento’s cult horror with a new 4k restoration

Phenomena (1985)

Before gaining fame battling David Bowie’s bewigged King Jareth in 1986’s Labyrinth, a 15-year-old Jennifer Connelly starred in Dario Argento’s bizarre and eccentric horror Phenomena.

Sent to a posh Swiss boarding school by her absent film star dad, Jennifer Corvino (Connelly) learns of a serial killer targeting young girls in the area. With the help of Donald Pleasence’s wheelchair-bound entomologist, Jennifer discovers she has special psychic powers and a natural affinity with insects. She then uses these skills to track down the killer.

This being an Argento film, much mayhem ensues with lashings of grisly decapitations and stabbings, swarms of insects, a razor-wielding chimp and that classic horror staple – a monster in the basement.

Phenomena (1985)

Argento’s cameras really soar to great heights here. Taking his cameras out of Rome’s studios for a change, he really goes to town on the beautiful Swiss landscapes (the film was shot around Appenzell and Canton St Gallen). Watching Arrow’s new 4k restoration on blu-ray is a real treat watching on a big screen as you find yourself yourself flying high above the alpines, like one of the winged beasties buzzing about.

As with all Argento films, music plays a huge role, from the incongruous (Iron Maiden’s Flash of the Blade bellowing out during one death scene really spoils the atmosphere) to the sublime, courtesy of Goblin of course (the scene in which Jennifer is led to the killer’s glove by a firefly is truly haunting). After Profundo Rosso and Suspiria, this is one of band’s best-ever Argento scores.

Phenomena (1985)

To be honest, I was never a big fan of Phenomena when I first saw it on VHS back in the late-1980s, as it was such a big departure from Argento’s previous supernatural shockers. But it is actually much better than I remembered.  In fact, I now ‘get’ what Argento was aiming for – a modern-day Grimm’s fairytale, with just a dash of surreal slash and gore. It’s not perfect, but it’s brutally beautiful work of cinematic art just the same – and probably Argento’s last truly great film.

Back in 2011 Arrow released a box-set containing a superb HD transfer of the Italian cut featuring some missing English audio sections, along with a ‘making of’ documentary, an interview with composer with Claudio Simonetti, and a Q&A with special effects artist Sergio Stivaletti. Now they have set their sights on creating the definitive home entertainment release – and if you look at what’s in the box, it just well maybe so.

Phenomena (1985)LIMITED EDITION CONTENTS:

DISC 1
• Brand new 4k restoration from the original camera negative (Arrow Video exclusive) of the 116-minute Italian version in High Definition Blu-ray (1080p)
• New hybrid English/Italian soundtrack 5.1 Surround/or Stereo with English subtitles
• New audio commentary by Troy Howarth, author of So Deadly, So Perverse: 50 Years of Italian Giallo Films
• Original Italian and English theatrical trailers
• Jennifer music video, directed by Dario Argento
• Rare Japanese vintage pressbook

DISC 2
• 110-minute international version in High Definition Blu-ray (1080p)
The Three Sarcophagi: a new visual essay by Michael Mackenzie comparing the different cuts of Phenomena

DISC 3
• 83-minute Creepers cut on High Definition Blu-ray (1080p)
Of Flies and Maggots: feature-length documentary (March 2017) including interviews with Dario Argento, actors Fiore Argento, Davide Marotta, Daria Nicolodi and Fiorenza Tessari, co-writer Franco Ferrini, cinematographer Romano Albani, production manager Angelo Jacono, assistant director Michele Soavi, special optical effects artist Luigi Cozzi, special makeup effects artist Sergio Stivaletti

PLUS:
• Remastered soundtrack CD featuring the complete Goblin instrumental soundtrack, plus four bonus tracks by Simon Boswell and Andi Sex Gang
• Limited edition 60-page booklet

 

 

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Ludwig (1973) | Luchino Visconti’s melancholy masterpiece gets a stupendous 4k restoration release

Ludwig (1973)Ludwig. He loved women. He loved men.
He lived as controversially as he ruled.
But he did not care what the world thought. He was the world.

In 1864, 18-year-old Ludwig II (Helmut Berger) ascends the throne of Bavaria. Following a scandal involving Richard Wagner (Trevor Howard) and his mistress Cosima von Bulow (Silvana Mangano), Ludwig is forced to expel them from Munich. Under pressure to marry, the latently homosexual king, who is having an intense relationship with Hungarian actor Josef Kainz (Folker Bohnet), agrees to an arranged wedding with his cousin Sophie (Sonia Petrovna). But the strain of this relationship, the war with Prussia, and fears of a conspiracy brewing his court play havoc on his mental state…

Visconti's Ludwig (1973)

With a string of masterpieces behind him – including Ossessione, Senso, The Leopard and Death in Venice – director Luchino Visconti turned his attentions to King Ludwig II of Bavaria with this lavish 1972 historical drama that traces his bizarre 22-year reign, ending with his mysterious death in June 1886.

Sporting a sickly countenance and redden eyelids, Helmut Berger’s Ludwig cuts a miserable figure, who sinks further into despair and madness as he moves from one overly ornate palace and castle to another, which soon become gilded prisons, made all the more claustrophobic by the incessant rain and snow showers.

Visconti's Ludwig (1973)

Featuring Armando Nannuzzi’s sumptuous cinematography and Piero Tosi’s Oscar-nominated costume design, Visconti mounts his epic of 19th century decadence on such an opulent scale – and in the very locations that the real king lived (*) – that it needs to be seen in its entirety to admire its dazzling operatic stature. And this new Arrow Academy release presents the film in its completed form in accordance with the director’s wishes, and – for the first time on home video – includes the English-language soundtrack.

Berger dominates every scene, but he does get some excellent support from the ever-reliable Trevor Howard, who is the spitting image of Wagner, and The House That Screamed’s John Moulder-Brown, as his mentally-unstable brother, Prince Otto, while Romy Schneider reprises her Elisabeth of Austria characterisation from the classic Sissi trilogy. The music includes Richard Wagner’s last original composition for piano, as well as works by Offenbach and Shuman. A melancholy masterpiece deserving of a revisit.

Ludwig Arrow Academy box-setARROW ACADEMY RELEASE
• 4K restoration from the original film negative
• High Definition Blu-ray (1080p) and Standard Definition DVD presentations
• Two viewing options: the full-length theatrical cut (1hr:15min) or as five individual parts (with the full pisodes 1-3 are on disc 2)
• Original Italian soundtrack with optional English subtitles
• Original English soundtrack available with optional English subtitles (This version also includes the Italian soundtrack where no English track was recorded… which makes for any interesting experience. But if you are familiar with Italian, then it works quite smoothly)
• Interview with actor Helmut Berger (OMG! Be afraid! Be very afraid! Helmut is very candid and very eccentric)
• Interview with producer Dieter Geissler (who also did Short Night of the Glass Dolls, Without Warning and The Neverending Story)
Luchino Visconti: an hour-long documentary portrait of the director by Carlo Lizzani (Requiescant) containing interviews with Burt Lancaster, Vittorio Gassman, Francesco Rosi, Claudia Cardinale and others
Speaking with Suso Cecchi d’Amico: an interview with the screenwriter
Silvana Mangano – The Scent Of A Primrose: a portrait of the actress (30min)
• Theatrical trailer
• Collector’s booklet containing new writing by Peter Cowie (first pressing only)

DID YOU KNOW?
(*) The film was shot on location in Munich and Bavaria, including Roseninsel, Berg Castle, Lake Starnberg, Castle Herrenchiemsee, Castle Hohenschwangau, Linderhof Palace, Cuvilliés Theatre, Nymphenburg Palace, Ettal, Kaiservilla and Neuschwanstein Castle.

 

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