Category Archives: World Cinema

The Passenger (1975) | Michelangelo Antonioni’s arthouse thriller is a knockout visual masterpiece

The Passenger (1975)

If you haven’t seen or heard of Michelangelo Antonioni’s 1975 thriller The Passenger – then you are in for a treat thanks to the new Indicator Blu-ray courtesy of Powerhouse Films.

Alienation of man in the modern world and lost identities were key themes in the film canon of Michelangelo Antonioni, who was a master manipulator of the conventional narrative. Just witness his 1960s quartet, La Notte, L’Eclisse, L’avventura and il deserto rosso, and his hip cult hit Blow-Up.

After a dalliance with the American counterculture movement in 1970s Zabriskie Point, the Italian auteur returned to his favourite themes for The Passenger, his third film with producer Carlo Ponti.  Unfortunately, it died a death at the box office and quickly went out of circulation for many decades, until a re-release back in 2005, which has resulted in a growing new appreciation for this hidden gem.

This is the first time that the film has been released on Blu-ray  in the UK,  and the re-master is a knockout! Now, I absolutely adore Antonioni’s eye for the visual.  Every shot is framed with a painterly approach, and he really knows how to use landscape and architecture as character.

The Passenger (1975)

The Passenger is no exception. Just take a look at the above screen grab. This was taken from a scene shot in a specially-built hotel in the Almeria town of Vera (standing in for Osuna in the film). The way the light falls on the straight lines of the interior just makes me swoon. The art decoration is by Piero Poletto (who also worked on L’Eclisse and L’avventura), while the camerawork is courtesy of Lucian Tovoli, who’d famously go onto lens Dario Argento’s Suspiria two years later.

Brunswick Shopping Centre

Tovoli makes great use of some stunning Spanish locations and especially some iconic modernist buildings, including Antoni Gaudi’s La Pedrera and Parc Guell in Barcelona, and Patrick Hodgkinson’s modernist Brunswick Centre in London’s Bloomsbury (which had opened just a couple of years before the film was made).

But the stand-out scene is a seven-minute long tacking shot right at the end of the movie – and it is worth the wait as it was a major technical achievement at the time, that required the camera to move through a door barred with grates, then do a 180 degree turn and return back to the hotel interior. Of course, it could all be done with CGI today, but here Antonioni is at his most inventive and meticulous.

Typical of the director, the story is real head-spinner. Jack Nicholson plays world-weary journalist David Locke, who is making a documentary in Chad when he impulsively takes on the identity of a man called Robertson, whom he finds dead in his hotel room. He sees it as a chance to escape his old life and his wayward wife Rachel (The Final Programme‘s Jenny Runacre).

But he gets more than he bargained for when it turns out Robertson was a shady arms dealer and rashly takes a bundle of cash from gun-runners who want their merchandise. And Locke’s problems don’t stop there, as Rachel wants answers about his death and a cat and mouse situation ensues as Locke tries to flee the country aided by a young architecture student (Maria Schneider of Last Tango in Paris fame)…

This Blu-ray release of Antonioni’s arty road movie-cum-thriller is probably my favourite find of 2018 so far. It is also Jack Nicholson’s favourite film  – so much so, he owns a personal print of the film.

Powerhouse Films’ Indicator UK Blu-ray release features a high definition remaster with the original mono audio and new and improved English subtitles, and the following special features…

• Alternative presentation: Italian Professione
• Audio commentary with actor Jack Nicholson (2006)
• Audio commentary with screenwriter Mark Peploe and journalist Aurora Irvine (2006)
• Audio commentary with film historian Adrian Martin (2018)
• Jenny Runacre on The Passenger (2018, 15 mins)
• Steven Berkoff on The Passenger (2018, 11 mins)
Profession Reporter (1975, 5 mins): archival interview with Michelangelo Antonioni at Cannes Film Festival
• Antonioni on Cinema (1975, 5 mins): the acclaimed filmmaker on his philosophy of cinema
• The Final Sequence (1985, 13 mins): Antonioni analyses the climactic sequence
• Original theatrical trailer
• Gallery
• Collector’s booklet with a new essay by Amy Simmons

 

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Jarman – Volume One: 1972-1986 | Six of the best from the iconoclastic British artist collected and restored on Blu-ray

Jarman Volume 124 years have gone by since his death aged just 52, but the legacy of British filmmaker Derek Jarman (1942-1994) lives on, and his highly personal work has lost none of its relevance or impact. The BFI have now released the first of two deluxe limited edition box sets that bring together six of his feature films on Blu-ray for the first time.

In the Shadow of the Sun (1974), Jarman’s debut abstract short film is comprised of a series of Super 8 films and is provided with a soundtrack from music group Throbbing Gristle. Personally, it was thanks to this film that I started experimenting with my own short films, and turned me into a big fan of Throbbing Gristle, Psychic TV and Coil.

Sebastiane (1976), Jarman’s debut feature film, spoken entirely in Latin and featuring an ambient score from Brian Eno, is an homoerotic account of the life and martyrdom of Saint Sebastiane (Leonardo Treviglio), a Roman soldier who is exiled to a remote outpost where his commanding officer (Barney James) becomes obsessed by him.

Jubilee (1978) | Queen Elizabeth I (Jenny Runacre) is transported through time from 1578 to 1978 by her astrologer John Dee (Richard O’Brien), where she sees what has become of her once glorious kingdom where law and order has broken down. Adam Ant, Toyah Wilcox and Jordan co-star.

The Tempest (1979) | Jarman creates his own interpretation of Shakespeare’s final play. Abandoned on a remote island by his brother Antonio (Richard Warwick), Prospero (Heathcote Williams), the former Duke of Milan, engineers a shipwreck to bring Ferdinand (David Meyer) the Prince of Naples, and his daughter Miranda (Toyah Wilcox) together in a bid to restore peace between Milan and Naples.

The Angelic Conversation (1985), a selection of Shakespeare’s sonnets are read by Judi Dench over atmospheric music by Coil and tableaux images of landscapes and people.

Caravaggio (1986) | A heavily stylised biopic of the Renaissance Italian painter Caravaggio (Nigel Terry) who falls in love with his muse, street thug, Ranuccio Thomasoni (Sean Bean).

Derek Jarman’s first six feature films have all been newly scanned at 2K from original film elements and are presented in this first box set alongside some incredible extras (listed below), all drawn from Jarman’s archive of workbooks and papers held in BFI Special Collections, plus a host of interviews with key cast, crew and friends, which have been exclusively produced for this release.

You can purchase Jarman – Volume One: 1972-1986 direct from the BFI bookshop or from Amazon and HMV (in the UK).

SPECIAL FEATURES
Sebastiane: A Work in Progress (1975): newly remastered from 16mm film elements held by the BFI National Archive, this sadly incomplete early black and white work-print differs significantly from the finished film. This previously unseen alternate edit – assembled in a different order, featuring a different soundtrack – was never subtitled or released
The Making of Sebastiane (Derek Jarman & Hugh Smith, 1975): previously unseen Super 8 footage shot on location in Sardinia
Jazz Calendar (1968): a rarely screened documentary record of the 1968 ballet by Frederick Ashton, performed by The Royal Ballet at the Royal Opera House, for which Jarman designed sets and costumes
Sloane Square: A Room of One’s Own (1974-76)
• John Scarlett-Davis remembers Sebastiane (2018)
• Message from the Temple (1981)
• TG: Psychic Rally in Heaven (1981)
Pirate Tape (WS Burroughs Film) (1982)
Toyah Willcox: Being Mad (2014)
• Jordan remembers Jubilee (2018)
• Lee Drysdale remembers Jubilee (2018)
Stormy Weather: the Magic Behind The Tempest (2016): Toyah Willcox and Stuart Hopps share their memories of working on The Tempest
• John Scarlett-Davis remembers The Tempest (2018)
• Don Boyd remembers The Tempest (2018)
A Meeting of Minds: Christopher Hobbs on collaborating with Derek Jarman (2018)
Fragments of Memory: Christopher Hobbs on working with Derek Jarman (2007)
To the Cliffs: James Mackay on working with Derek Jarman (2007)
Derek Jarman: The Films that Never Were (2018): A look back on unrealised Derek Jarman features, including Egyptian period drama Akhenaten and science fiction horror Neutron
Akhenaten Image Gallery & Neutron storyboards
• Audio commentary for Caravaggio by cinematographer Gabriel Beristain
Caravaggio in Docklands (1985)
Kind Blasphemy: Nigel Terry on Derek Jarman and Caravaggio (2007)
• Tilda Swinton on Derek Jarman and Caravaggio (2007)
• Italy of the Memory: Christopher Hobbs on Caravaggio (2007)
• Dexter Fletcher on Caravaggio (2014)
• Christopher Hobbs remembers Caravaggio (2018)
• Derek Jarman interviewed by Derek Malcolm (1986, audio only)
In the Studio: Caravaggio soundtrack recording sessions (1986, audio only)
• Derek Jarman’s Caravaggio notebook (Gallery)
• Five galleries featuring storyboards, production designs and Jarman’s notes on Caravaggio
• Image galleries
• Original theatrical trailers for The Angelic Conversation and Caravaggio
• 80-page collector’s book

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Inferno (2009) | Documenting Henri-Georges Clouzot’s all-consuming passion

Inferno (2009)

French director Henri-Georges Clouzot is best-known for his critically-acclaimed suspense films, Le Corbeau, Les Diaboliques (which inspired Hitchcock’s Psycho) and Wages of Fear. But by the mid-1960s, as cinema took a step to the left ‘Bank’ with the rise of the French New Wave, Clouzot and his thrillers were dismissed as old hat (which was pretty weird considering how much young bloods like Truffaut and Godard admired Hitchcock’s Psycho). But owing to his international reputation, Clouzot got a blank cheque from US studio Columbia to make any projected he wanted.

Set in a lakeside resort in Auvergne, 1964’s L’enfer d’Henri-Georges Clouzot (aka Inferno) was to be a sun-scorched elucidation on the dark depths of jealousy with Romy Schneider (famous for the 1950’s Sissi period dramas) playing the harassed wife of a controlling hotel manager (The Leopard‘s Serge Reggiani).

But the production – which involved three crews and 150 technicians – was cursed from the outset. Reggiani fell ill and had to be replaced, the crew suffered badly from a July heatwave, the lake they were using as a location was about to be drained for a hydroelectric project and Clouzot suffered a heart attack. After three weeks, the film was shut down…

Inferno (2009)

But that’s not the end of the story as Clouzot had one more film in him – and it was a beauty. After getting the all-clear from his doctors and finishing a number of TV documentaries, Clouzot filmed La Prisonnière (1968), which incorporated stylistic elements from the aborted L’enfer.

Having just seen the new 4k restoration at a special screening in London, I can safely say this final work is Clouzot’s finest (and I shall be writing about that at length soon). But it would not have been possible without L’enfer – whose surviving footage forms the bases of this César Award-winning 2009 documentary.

Thirty years after Clouzot’s death in 1977, his widow, Inès de Gonzalez, found herself trapped in a lift with film-maker Serge Bromberg, during which time he learned that Inès had 185 cans of film (about 15 hours) of the unfinished film.

Entrusted with the material, Bromberg and fellow film-maker Ruxandra Medrea used selected bits of the expressionistic original rushes, screen tests, and on-location footage to reconstruct Clouzot’s original vision, while also shedding light on the ill-fated endeavour through interviews, dramatisations of unfilmed scenes, and Clouzot’s own notes.

The result is quite dramatic, especially as it puts a spotlight on the notoriously meticulous director who became increasingly alienated and paranoid (especially with his cast) as his dream project became an all-consuming passion – much like the Arabian Nights animation, The Thief and the Cobbler, the 30-years-in-the making but never finished project which took over the life of Richard Williams (and became the subject of the must-see 2012 documentary The Persistence of Vision).

The Arrow Academy release includes a HD Blu-ray presentation of the documentary, with original 5.1 DTS-HD Master Audio, optional English subtitles, and the following extra…

• Lucy Mazdon on Henri-Georges Clouzot, the French cinema expert and academic talks at length about the films of Clouzot and the troubled production of Inferno
They Saw Inferno, a featurette including unseen material, providing further insight into the production of Inferno
• Introduction and interview with Serge Bromberg
• Stills gallery
• Original trailer
• Reversible sleeve featuring newly commissioned artwork by Twins of Evil
• Illustrated collector’s booklet (first pressing only) featuring new writing on the film by Ginette Vincendeau

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Der Todesking (1989) | Jörg Buttgereit’s ‘Let Us Die’ existential horror gets a deluxe release in HD

DER TODESKING

The second feature film from German underground director Jörg Buttgereit, Der Todesking (aka The King of Death) gets the Arrow treatment on Blu-ray and DVD.

Der Todesking (1989)

‘In six days, God created heaven and earth. On the seventh, day he killed himself…’
And so, we The Brotherhood of the Seventh Day’ say ‘ Let Us Die’!

As a chain letter from an unseen, unknown group circulates encouraging its recipients to end their lives, a series of grim murder-suicides unfold over the course of a week while a body rots in limbo… But could this all be in the mind of a schoolgirl?

On Monday, a hard-working white collar worker climbs into a bath and takes a lethal overdose of pills.

On Tuesday, a slacker settles down to watch a Nazi death camp exploitation VHS film in which a victim is castrated with a pair of shears. But when his wife returns, he pulls out a gun and blows her head off (and then frames her bloodstains). But it all turns out to be a movie playing on TV in a room where a man’s dead body hangs.

On Wednesday, a woman pining for her former lover takes a rest on a park bench, where a man divulges his marital problems that ended in his wife’s decipitation. The woman then aims a gun at the man’s head. But before she can shoot, he takes the gun from her and blows his head off.

Der Todesking (1989)

On Thursday, the names of several people who committed sucide appear over shots of a bridge where people have jumped to their deaths.

On Friday, a woman living alone is so jealous of the couple in the apartment opposite that she schemes to interrupt their love-making. But when she tries calling the couple, she gets no answer because they have just joined the Brotherhood of the Seventh Day’s suicide cult.

On Saturday, a projector plays several reels of 16mm film in which a woman ties a camera to her body and heads to a heavy metal gig where she films herself shooting a gun at the concert-goers before turning it on herself.

On Sunday, a man, driven to madness by some unspecified mental disturbance, repeatedly slams his head into a wall before collapsing in a pool of his own blood.

Der Todesking (1989)

Jörg Buttgereit is most one of those Marmite directors whose transgressive films (Nekromantik, Nekromantik 2) you either ‘get’ or loathe. I’m certainly a big fan of his DIY underground style of film-making, which elevates the super 8mm home movie format (and 16mm) into arthouse territory.

Der Todesking is Buttgereit’s most accomplished work: an unapolegtic existential howl of rage laced with dark humour and the odd cinematic in-joke. Tuesday’s episode is an homage to the king of existential European art cinema, Jean-Luc Godard: beoming a joke about art, just like Weekend and Pierrot Le fou. While the other vignettes deal with some very serious issues: rejection, depression and mental illness.

But the episode that inventively fuses art with social comment is ‘Saturday’. Made up of bits of found-footage (surely ground-breaking back in the 1990s), it may have been inspired by the 1966 murder of 16 people by the Texas Tower Sniper, Charles Whitman (which informed Peter Bogdanovich’s Targets), but it also has continued relevance – especially when you consider the awful gun-led murder sprees (mainly in the US) that continue to dominate the news and make us question our humanity.

Der Todesking (1989)

Der Todesking is all bound together by some polar opposite imagery: a rotting corpse in limbo (like a Francis Bacon painting: all fleshy tones set against a blackened backdrop) and a little girl happily drawing a image of Death (which bizarrely has become a popular tattoo) in a playground where the gay laughter of other children can also be heard. What’s most unsettling about these striking sunlight scenes is that all that we have just witnessed might have come from the imagination of the little girl. It’s food for thought and worthy of discussion.

Arrow’s release features a brand-new director-approved HD transfer from the original 16mm negative in high definition (on Blu-ray and standard definition DVD), with the original stereo audio (uncompressed PCM on the Blu-ray), and optional English subtitles.

Der Todesking (1989)

SPECIAL FEATURES
• Audio commentary by Jörg Buttgereit and co-writer Franz Rodenkirchen
From Bundy to Lautréamont: Jörg Buttgereit interviewed at the 2016 Manchester Festival of Fantastic Films (the same place where Der Todesking had its British premiere on 14 October 1990)
Todesmusik: actor and composer Hermann Kopp on his numerous collaborations with Buttgereit
Skeleton Beneath the Skin: Graham Rae on the phenomenon of Todesking tattoos (plus, tattoo gallery)
• The Making of Der Todesking: Vintage production featurette (viewable with both an English-language audio track and a German-language audio track with subtitles)
The Letter: This is the alternate English-language chain letter insert used for the original UK VHS release
Eating the Corpse: Footage from the January 25 1990 premiere in Berlin at the Sputnik cinema using music from the film
Corpse Fucking Art: 1992 documentary on the making of Nekromantik, Der Todesking and Nekromantik 2 (choice of English-language and German-language with subtitles)
Die Reise ins Licht: Short film by Manfred O Jelinski (1972, 27mins) – Based on an LSD trip, this is a cardboard and paper 2001: A Space Odyssey-styled sci-fi set in a Blake’s 7 quarry. It’s actually more entertaining than John Carpenter’s student lo-fi Dark Star, and features some evocative bombed out ruins. Jelinski also provides an optional commentary – in broken English, which he apologises for.
Geliebter Wahnsinn (aka Beloved Madness): Short film by Manfred O Jelinski (1973, 7mins) – The hypnotic soundtrack (which reminded me of the Oz-electronic outfit, Severed Heads) is a perfect fit to the fusion of double-exposure and cut-ups that make up this widely experimental oddity.
Der Gollob: Short Super 8mm film by Jörg Buttgereit with optional audio commentary (1983, 25 mins, HD) This is Buttgereit’s take on Alien, in which some cops (played by Buttgereit and some mates) track down a pink putty-faced monster (a transmutated pizza) in the basement of a suburban Berlin house.
• Image Gallery
• Trailer Gallery

DER TODESKING

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Michael (1924) | Carl Th. Dreyer’s bittersweet silent classic gets a luminous 2K restoration

Michael (1924)From Eureka Entertainment comes the 2K restoration of Micheal from multi award-winning director Carl Th. Dreyer (Vampyr) as a world exclusive on Blu-ray from 12 February 2018.

Michael (1924)

Hailed as ‘an engrossing hybrid of romantic decadence and spiritual austerity’, this 1924 German silent is considered an important early cinematic work as it contains Dreyer’s first clear use of Expressionism to reveal emotion, and this is much aided by the luminous photography of Karl Freund and Rudolph Maté, and the sumptuous production design of architect Hugo Häring.

Michael (1924)

Based on Herman Bang’s 1902 novel Mikaël, and scripted by Thea von Harbou (best known for Metropolis and Woman in the Moon), the bittersweet love story centres on an elderly artist, Claude Zoret, who is driven to despair by his relationship with his young protégé, Michael.

Michael (1924)

Conceived as a screen version of Kammerspiel (an intimate ‘chamber’ piece for theatre), it also had a profound influence on several directors, including Alfred Hitchcock, who drew on the film’s motif’s for his script for 1925’s The Blackguard. It is also a landmark in gay cinema with regards to its frank portrayal of homosexual relations and desire – with the character of Zoret supposedly based on the real life painter Auguste Rodin.

Michael (1924)

The remarkable cast includes Benjamin Christensen (best known for being the director of the 1922 docu-drama Häxan) as ‘decadent’ artist Zoret; Walter Slezak (who would forge a career playing heavies and villains, including the Clock King in TV’s Batman) as his young protege, Michael; and Nora Gregor (from Jean Renoir’s La Règle du Jeu) as the bankrupt Countess who swindles and seduces the Master and his muse.

And, in his only ever appearance as an actor, the film’s cinematographer, Karl Freund plays a sycophantic art dealer who saves the tobacco ashes dropped by a famous painter. Best known for photographing Lang’s Metropolis, Freund later emigrated to the US, where he directed 10 films, including the Universal horror classics, The Mummy and Mad Love, before helming TV’s I Love Lucy.

Available to order from Amazon: http://amzn.to/2AEcJ3r

Michael (1924)

BLU-RAY SPECIAL FEATURES
• 1080p presentation from a new 2K restoration
• Score by Pierre Oser (piano, clarinet, cello) presented in uncompressed LPCM stereo
• Original German intertitles with optional English subtitles
• Full-length audio commentary by Dreyer scholar, Casper Tybjerg
• Exclusive video essay by critic and filmmaker David Cairns
• Illustrated audio interview with Dreyer from 1965
• A collector’s booklet featuring a new essay by Philip Kemp; a reprint of Tom Milne’s The World Inside Me from 1971; Jean Renoir’s 1968 tribute, Dreyer’s Sin; a translation of the original 1924 Danish programme; a reprint of Nick Wrigley’s essay from the film’s 80th anniversary DVD release; and a selection of archival imagery

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Viva l’Italia! (1961) | Roberto Rossellini’s celebration of Italy’s national hero Giuseppe Garibaldi is a cinematic triumph

Viva l_Italia (1961)

From Arrow Films comes Robert Rossellini’s 1961 historical tour-de-force Viva l’Italia! on Blu-ray and DVD with a brand-new 2k restoration.

To celebrate the centenary of Italy, director Roberto Rossellini was commissioned by the Italian government in 1960 to make a biopic of Giuseppe Garibaldi, the country’s national hero, tracing his most famous military campaign, the 1860 Expedition of the Thousand, in which he liberated the south of Italy from the Bourbons.

Viva l_Italia (1961)

Rossellini said of the film: ‘Of all my films, I’m proudest of Viva L’Italia! I consider it important as a work of research, the most carefully done of all my films. It is a documentary made after the event, trying to figure out what happened. I tried to place myself in front of the events of a century ago, the way a documentarist would have done who had the good fortune to follow Garibaldi’s campaign with his camera.’

Viva l_Italia (1961)

This is World Cinema classic is must-see and having recently visited Sicily myself, I must say I got quite emotional watching this compelling 138-minute epic.

Featuring sweeping, majestic vistas of the Italian landscape, and using many of the locations where Garibaldi’s campaign took place as his Camicie rosse (Red shirts) marched across Sicily, sailed over the Strait of Messina into Calabria, then headed north through Campania (where the strategic Battle of Volturno took place) and onto Naples (where King Francis II ruled), Rossellini’s drama is as as much a spectacular visual feast as it is an important historical account of a defining moment in Italian history – the unification of the country.

It also serves as a powerful David and Goliath parable in which a band of ill-equipped, untrained volunteers (mainly poor farmers and workers) stood up against the might of a powerful army – and won!

Viva l_Italia (1961)

Restored by Arrow from the original negative, and given a 2k restoration, this presentation (on Blu-ray and standard definition DVD) is the first UK home video release of Viva l’Italia! in any format. It also includes the original Italian mono soundtracks with optional (and may I say excellent) English subtitles.

Also included is an alternate shorter cut of the film originally prepared for the US market, a visual essay on Garibaldi and an interview with Rossellini’s assistant on the film, Ruggero Deodato (best-known for Cannibal Holocaust and House on the Edge of the Park, who greatly admired the legendary neo-realist director).

Cult film fans might get a kick out of knowing that the cinematographer, Luciano Trasatti worked on a slew of Peplum films as well as some Euro horrors like Jesùs Franco’s Count Dracula (1970), and watch out for Tina Louise, aka Ginger from Gilligan’s Island, who pops up as a French journalist.

Viva l'Italia (1961)

SPECIAL FEATURES
• Garibaldi: Alternate shorter cut of the film originally prepared for the US market
• Viva Rossellini: Interview with Ruggero Deodato
• I Am Garibaldi: a visual essay by Tag Gallagher, author of The Adventures of Roberto Rossellini: His Life and Films
• Reversible sleeve with original and newly commissioned artwork by Sean Phillip
• Booklet containing new writing on the film by film-maker and critic Michael Pattison

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The Battle of Algiers (1966) | Gillo Pontecorvo’s masterpiece of political cinema resonates in a newly restored 4k release

The Battle of Algiers (1966)

From CultFilms comes the release of the newly restored 4K version of The Battle of Algiers, which arrives for the first time in the UK in dual format (Blu-ray/DVD).

The Battle of Algiers (1966)

A blistering attack on the savagery that was endured in order for Algeria to attain independence from the French, 1966’s The Battle of Algiers is one of the most influential political movies of all time and won many awards for its Italian director Gillo Pontecorvo.

The film concentrates on the years between 1954 and 1957 when guerrilla fighters began operating in the Casbah, the citadel of Algiers, which became a flashpoint for the French to regain territory. Told in flashback, it centres on one cell within the National Liberation Front (the FLN), which includes Ali la Pointe, a petty criminal who politically radicalised while in jail, then recruited by FLN commander El-hadi Jafar; Larbi Ben M’hidi, a top FLN leader, and three women who carry out a series of bombings.

Shot in a documentary style, using the actual locations of key events, and drawing on local people to dramatise the major players (including Algerian activist Saadi Yacef, whose 1966 memoir Souvenirs de la Bataille d’Alger inspired the film – he plays El-hadi Jafar and also produced), Pontecorvo’s film possesses a realism that continues to astonish. It remains the perfect marriage of politics and cinema – like an Algerian take on Roberto Rossellini’s quintessential neorealist masterpiece Rome Open City (1945) fused with striking Eisenstein-esque visuals and the political eye of Pasolini.

The Battle of Algiers (1966)

Although made as a propaganda piece, the Algerian-Italian co-production is remarkably un-partisan in its approach: with the murderous consequences of the guerrillas’ bombing campaign and the French torturing their prisoners being given equal emphasis throughout.

The arresting opening sequence in which the camera looks out over the roof tops of Algiers sets the forceful tone of what follows, and the scene in which the French colonel, Mathieu (played by the film’s only actor, Jean Martin) proudly leads his paratroopers through the street is at once heroic but also utterly futile (it’s also a telling statement on colonialism).

The Battle of Algiers (1966)

But it’s the film’s vast crowd scenes that will stay with you forever – that and the carefully-curated score, which skilfully weaves Ennio Morricone’s action movie beats with indigenous drumming, the ululation chanting of the Casbah women, classical ostinato composition and Bach’s St Matthew Passion.

Digitally re-mastered in 4K and restored preserving the grainy, newsreel look that the director Gillo Pontecorvo designed, the restoration was made by the L’Immagine Ritrovata with the participation of the director’s son, cinematographer and director Marco Pontecorvo, in collaboration with CultFilms and was nominated for the Best Restored Version Award at the 2016 Venice Film Festival.

Special features include:
• New extra on the 4K restoration
The Making of the Battle of Algiers (interview with Director Gillo Pontecorvo)
The Real Battle of Algiers (interview with producer Saadi Yacef, head of FLN guerrillas in Algiers)
Our War for Freedom (interview with FLN fighter Zohra Drif Bitat)
• Exclusive Presentation by director Paul Greengrass
• Exclusive interview with director Ken Loach
• Booklet hugely informative essays on the genesis of the film and it’s cinematic legacy

The Battle of Algiers (1966)

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Luis Buñuel: The Essential Collection | Seven must-see world cinema classics

Buñuel Boxset [Blu-ray]StudioCanal celebrates the work of the Spanish surrealist director Luis Buñuel with an Essential Collection box set featuring re-issues of seven of the director’s most significant films on Blu-ray.

Diary-of-a-Chambermaid

Diary of a Chambermaid (1964)
This biting satire of a middle-class French family in 1939 is drawn from Octave Mirbeau’s infamous novel and was an ideal subject for Buñuel’s particular incisive talents. Jeanne Moreau plays Celestine, a Parisian chambermaid who ingrains herself in a scandal with her philandering employer (Michel Piccoli).

Extras include a documentary and an interview with writer Jean-Claude Carrière. In French.

Belle de Jour

Belle de Jour (1967)
The 50th Anniversary Edition | 4k Restoration

A surrealistic voyage into the mind of a bored, wealthy housewife (Catherine Deneuve), who leads the double life of afternoon prostitution. This exquisite and spellbinding film won the Best Picture award at the 1976 Venice Film Festival.

Extras include interviews with writer Jean-Claude Carrière, director Diego Buñuel and Dr Sylvain Mimoun, commentary by professor Peter W Evans, and a trailer. In French.

The Milky Way

The Milky Way (1969)
The pilgrimage from Paris to the shrine of Santiago de Compostela in Spain of two French vagrants is interrupted by a series of bizarre encounters in this witty, metaphysical romp which became the first film in the director’s trilogy about ‘the search for truth’ (which was followed by The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie and The Phantom of Liberty). 

Extras include a documentary, an interview with writer Jean-Claude Carrière, analysis by Peter W Evans and a trailer. In French.

Tristana

Tristana (1970)
In 1929 Toledo, innocent and devout orphan Tristana (Catherine Deneuve) goes to live with her guardian, Don Lope (Fernando Rey), whose fatherly affection turns to desire. But then Tristana falls for the charms of a young artist (Franco Nero). A mischievous mix of passion, social satire and black comedy, this is one of Buñuel’s most enjoyable films, and contains compelling performances from both Rey and Deneuve.

Extras include an interview with Franco Nero, a documentary and a trailer. In French, and also in Spanish.

The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie (1972)
Winner of the 1972 Best Foreign Film Oscar, Buñuel’s sly, subversive satire is his surreal masterpiece. Again the director blurs the lines between dreams and realities in this wickedly funny puzzle box in which six middle-class characters try to dine together, but fate intervenes…

Extras include an interview with writer Jean-Claude Carrière, analysis by Peter W Evans, a documentary and a trailer. In French and Spanish.

Phantom-of-Liberty

The Phantom of Liberty (1974)
It’s impossible to describe the plot of this absurdist comedy, as it there isn’t one! It all begins with Napoleon’s invasion of Spain and ends with a revolution in the zoo: and the succession of surreal incidents in between make this the most anarchically funny of Buñuel’s canon. It’s most notorious scene features an elegant soiree with guests seated at toilet bowls…

Extras include an interview with writer Jean-Claude Carrière, analysis by Peter W Evans, a documentary and a photo gallery. In French.

That Obscure Object of Desire (1977)
Buñuel’s final film, which earned him the Best Foreign Film Oscar, is a rich, blackly comic, study in sexual obsession and politics. Fernando Rey is perfectly cast as middle-aged bourgeois businessman Mathieu, who becomes tortured by his desire for elusive maid, Conchita, played by two actresses, Carole Bouquet and Angela Molina.

Extras include interviews with writer Jean-Claude Carrière, Diego Buñuel, Carlos Saura, Carole Bouquet, Angela Molina, Pierre Lady and Edmond Richard. In French and Spanish.

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Buñuel: The Essential Collection | Seven must-sees from the surrealist master

Buñuel Boxset [Blu-ray]

StudioCanal celebrates the work of the Spanish surrealist director Luis Buñuel with an Essential Collection box set featuring re-issues of seven of the director’s most significant films on Blu-ray.

Diary of a Chambermaid

Diary of a Chambermaid (1964)
(aka) Le journal d’une femme de chambre
This biting satire of a middle-class French family in 1939 is drawn from Octave Mirbeau’s infamous 1900 novel and was an ideal subject for Buñuel’s particular incisive talents.

Jeanne Moreau plays Celestine, a Parisian chambermaid who ingrains herself in a scandal with her philandering employer (Michel Piccoli). About halfway through, when a child is murdered, the film shifts focus, but Buñuel’s mercurial talent makes it work, while also maintaining our fascination for the narrative. And bubbling away under Buñuel’s dabbling into fetishism and murder is a scathing look at the burgeoning French fascism of the era. In French.

Extras include a documentary and an interview with writer Jean-Claude Carrière.

Belle de Jour

Belle de Jour (1967)
The 50th Anniversary Edition | 4k Restoration

A surrealistic voyage into the mind of a bored, wealthy housewife (Catherine Deneuve), who leads the double life of afternoon prostitution. Buñuel blends memory, fantasy and reality, seamlessly, and it is never certain if what is seen is reality or fantasy. This exquisite and spellbinding film won the Best Picture award at the 1976 Venice Film Festival. In French.

Extras include interviews with writer Jean-Claude Carrièere, director Diego Buñuel and Dr Sylvain Mimoun, commentary by professor Peter W Evans, and a trailer.

READ MY FULL REVIEW HERE

The Milky Way

The Milky Way (1969)
(aka) La Voie lactée
Buñuel’s witty, metaphysical romp through Catholic doctrine became the first film in the director’s trilogy about ‘the search for truth’ and was  followed by The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie and The Phantom of Liberty.

The pilgrimage from Paris to the shrine of Santiago de Compostela in Spain of two French vagrants (played by Paul Frankeur and Laurent Terzieff) is interrupted by a series of bizarre encounters which end up becoming a trip through the history of heresy set over the last 2000 years.

Slipping through time and sometimes into other characters, the pilgrims keep doggedly on their chosen path, meeting Christ, the Devil, the Marquis de Sade and Delphine Seyrig’s prostitute along the way. It may be hard going and uneven at times, but this crazy tapestry of jokes, arguments and fantasy is never dull and pure Buñuel. In French.

Extras include a documentary, an interview with writer Jean-Claude Carrière, analysis by Peter W Evans and a trailer.

Tristana

Tristana (1970)
In 1929 Toledo, innocent and devout orphan Tristana (Catherine Deneuve) goes to live with her guardian, Don Lope (Fernando Rey), whose fatherly affection turns to desire. At first, Tristana submits to his advances, but then she falls for a young artist (Franco Nero) and moves to Madrid with him. When she falls gravely ill, Tristana is force to return to Toledo where she finds her prospects changed…

A mischievous mix of passion, social satire and black comedy, this is one of Buñuel’s most enjoyable films, and contains compelling performances from both Rey (whose character was based on Buñuel’s own father) and Deneuve (whose innocence was informed by the director’s younger sister Conchita).

Buñuel’s signature satire is very much on display here, but he never forgets to keep us glued to the central story drawn from the eponymous novel by Benito Pérez Galdós’ – regarded as Spain’s Dickens.  Cinematographer José F Aguayo captures the streets of Toledo in all it’s post-war grittiness, while the bell tower in the city’s Gothic Cathedral and the marble tomb of Cardinal Tavera provide some of film’s most haunting images. In French, and also in Spanish.

Extras include an interview with Franco Nero, a documentary and a trailer.

Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoise

The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie (1972)
(aka) Le Charme Discret de la Bourgeoisie
Winner of the 1972 Best Foreign Film Oscar, Buñuel’s sly, subversive satire is his surreal masterpiece. Again the director blurs the lines between dreams and realities in this wickedly funny puzzle box in which six middle-class characters try to dine together, but fate intervenes…

Fernando Rey is the ambassador holding the dinner party, while his wife (Delphine Seyrig) would rather make love in the garden – and the constant interruptions include soldiers on manoeuvres and terrorists bursting in…. Written by Bunuel’s frequent collaborator, Jean-Claude Carrière, this the most Buñuel of Bunuel’s canon. In French and Spanish.

Extras include an interview with Carrière, analysis by Peter W Evans, a documentary and a trailer. In French and Spanish.

The Phantom of Liberty

The Phantom of Liberty (1974)
(aka) Le Fantôme de la liberté)
In his penultimate film, the 74-year-old Buñuel shows that he can still make the kind of subversive statements and deeply personal films that he did at the very start of his film-making career with Un Chien Andalou and L’Age D’Or.

It’s impossible to describe the plot of this perversely playful absurdist comedy, as there isn’t one! Instead, it contains short incidents and scenarios collected from throughout Buñuel’s life, arranged in the style of a surreal game where seemingly disconnected ideas are linked by chance encounters.

It all begins with Napoleon’s invasion of Spain and ends with a revolution in the zoo: and the succession of surreal incidents in between make this the most anarchically funny of Buñuel’s canon. The most notorious scene features an elegant soiree with guests seated at toilet bowls. In French.

Extras include an interview with writer Jean-Claude Carrière, analysis by Peter W Evans, a documentary and a photo gallery.

That Obscure Object of Desire

That Obscure Object of Desire (1977)
(aka) Cet obscur objet du désir
Buñuel’s final film, which earned him, Carrière and producer Serge Silberman the Best Foreign Film Oscar, is a rich, blackly comic, study in sexual obsession.

Fernando Rey (dubbed here by Michel Piccoli) is perfectly cast as middle-aged bourgeois businessman Mathieu, who becomes tortured by his desire for elusive maid, Conchita, played by two actresses, Carole Bouquet and Angela Molina. It’s a bizarre concept that works to emphasise the different sides of her character (sophisticated French beauty vs Spanish coquette), whose mesmeric qualities make Mathieu unaware of the terrorist violence occurring around him. The same story was previously filmed in 1935 as The Devil is a Woman with Marlene Dietrich.

Extras include interviews with writer Jean-Claude Carrière, Diego Buñuel, Carlos Saura, Carole Bouquet, Angela Molina, Pierre Lady and Edmond Richard. In French and Spanish.

Buñuel Boxset [Blu-ray]

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Belle de Jour (1967) | Luis Buñuel’s exquisite exploration of female desire gets a 50th anniversary 4k restoration release

Belle de Jour (1967)

From Studiocanal comes the newly-restored 4k version of director Luis Buñuel’s Belle de Jour (1967) starring Catherine Deneuve, Jean Sorel and Michel Piccoli.

Belle de Jour (1967)

Séverine (Catherine Deneuve), the reserved wife of successful Parisian surgeon Pierre (Jean Sorel), is prone to masochistic fantasies which reveal her sexual frustration. Driven by a mixture of ennui and curiosity, she pays a visit to a brothel run by Madame Anaïs (Geneviève Page), where she begins to work there during the day under the name Belle de Jour.

Seemingly having found an inner peace through the satisfaction of her clients’ desires, things soon turn sour when Marcel (Michel Piccoli), a loutish friend of Pierre’s, insists on having Séverine all to himself. Panic-stricken, Séverine quits her dangerous day job but is it too late?

Belle de Jour (1967)

Buñuel blends memory, fantasy and reality, seamlessly, in his surrealistic voyage into the mind of Deneuve’s bored housewife to show the deep mysteries of sex without showing the sex act itself – and it is never certain if what is seen is reality or fantasy.

Sumptuously filmed in and around the streets of Paris (many of which you can still visit today), it is a exquisite exploration of female desire, but the film’s moral tone shocked the notorious British social activist Mary Whitehouse into a vocal campaign against the BBC on its first TV screening.

It was, however, Buñuel’s most successful film of his entire career, winning the Best Picture award at the 1976 Venice Film Festival. A spellbinding must-have for your world cinema collection.

Belle de Jour (1967)

The 50th Anniversary Edition is out now on DVD, Blu-Ray and Digital download with brand new extras material (see below) and 6 exclusive art cards.

SPECIAL FEATURES
• Commentary by professor Peter W Evans
• The Last Script
• A Story of Perversion or Emancipation?
• Interview with Dr Sylvain Mimoun
• NEW Trailer
• NEW Jean-Claude Carrière interview (fascinating stuff)
• NEW Masterclass with Diego Buñuel and Jean-Claude Carrière (also very illuminating)

Belle de Jour (1967)

To accompany the re-issue and to celebrate work of the Spanish surrealist director, Buñuel: The Essential Collection, a box-set of 7 of the director’s most significant films, will be released next week (and I can’t wait).

Luis Bunuel box-set

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