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Endless Poetry (2016) | Alejandro Jodorowsky’s ode to beauty is one of pure exalted joy

Endless Poetry (2016)

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If you’re already familiar with the outré  cinema of Alejandro Jodorowsky, then you’re going to have a whole lot of fun spotting the real-life influences on his 1989 surreal horror Santa Sangre in this exuberant follow-up to his 2013 auto-biopic The Dance of Reality.

Endless Poetry (2016)

In 1940’s Santiago, alienated youngster Alejandro (Jeremias Herskovits) has an epiphany that his destiny is to become a poet. When he finally rebels against his ultra conservative father, Alejandro (now played by the director’s real-life son, Adan) moves in with a group of young anti-establishment artists, where he turns his hand to puppetry and clowning. Immersing himself in this carefree creative world, Alejandro’s metamorphosis leads him to discover an inner truth: that every path in life (both good or bad) is meant to be lived…

Endless Poetry (2016)

This is one Jodorowsky’s most personal films, where he strips away layers of ego to lay bare his inner self – and, in doing so, reveals up his influences for Santa Sangre. It’s also very much a family affair (both on and off-screen), for at the heart of his second auto-biopic is the troubled relationship that the director’s twentysomething self had with his father Jaime (played by another of Alejandro’s sons, Brontis).

Endless Poetry (2016)

Jodorowsky’s portrayal of Jaime is very much like the character of Orgo in Santa Sangre, which centred on the circus performer’s unstable son Fenix (who were played by brothers Adan and Axel) enacting revenge in the guise of his dead mother.

Watch carefully and you’ll spot a man with missing arms appearing in Endless Poetry. This is another reference to the director’s brilliant surreal horror in which Fenix’s mother Conchita has her arms cut off by Orgo after pouring acid on his testicles. Two other characters also appear – the Tattoo Lady (in the form of Alejandro’s red-headed muse) and the tutu-wearing Alma (as a dance-obsessed member of the art collective).

Endless Poetry (2016)

Endless Poetry (2016)

In Jodorowsky’s universe symbolism is everything, and here he weaves a visually-rich tapestry in which every image is a metaphor or signifier linked to the Tarot’s cycle of birth, death and renewal. Some images are quite strong – almost too much so, like the sex scene involving a dwarf having her period – but in Jodorowsky’s hand, these images become transformative rather than for shock value.

Others – like the incredible Day of the Dead carnival sequence – are just pure exalted joy. United these stunning images bring to visceral life the chaotic paths that we must all take to seek out our own inner truth, self enlightenment and life’s ‘endless’ poetry, which only Jodorowsky can get away with describing as ‘the luminous excrement of a toad that swallowed a firefly’ and make it sound truly beautiful.

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The Saragossa Manuscript (1965) | Wojciec Has’ surreal supernatural masterpiece restored on Blu-ray

The Saragossa ManuscriptA huge favourite of cult director’s Luis Buñuel and David Lynch, as well as rock star Jerry Garcia, the surreal supernatural tale The Saragossa Manuscript  from legendary Polish director Wojciec Has is a mysteriously magical and sometimes disturbing 1960s cult classic like no other.

Adapted from the highly esteemed explorer Jan Potocki’s magnum opus, The Saragossa Manuscript encompasses a whole new supernatural world. During Napoleon’s invasion of Spain, two soldiers of opposing sides discover a strange manuscript at an Inn.

Spanning centuries and nations the magical text chronicles the adventures of Alfonso van Worden and follows a rich slew of journeys from the humorous to the horrifying, to the chilling final revelations.

Alternatively frightening and comical in its mind-bending exploration of human nature, the surreal 1965 film beautifully presents Has’ intricate approach to story telling, and is now available in a restored version on Blu-ray from Mr Bongo Films.

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The Dance of Reality (2013) | Alejandro Jodorowsky’s fantastical autobiography is a transformative experience

The Dance of RealityIt’s been a long wait between films for Chilean film director Alejandro Jodorowsky (something like 25 years), but it’s been worth it – especially as it has given the 86-year-old auteur the chance to layer this fantastical autobiography with the same mystical elements that he has been studying for over past 60 years, and which he brought together in his magnum opus The Way of Tarot.

Self-realisation, creativity and healing are the cornerstones of that profound study (of which I am a student), and Jodorowsky’s ‘psychomagic’ system is what also drives The Dance of Reality (aka La danza de la realidad), which re-imagines the young Alejandro’s unhappy childhood in the Chilean copper-mining town of Tocopill during the 1930’s.

dance of reality_2

‘The story of my life is a constant effort to expand the imagination and its limitations, to capture its therapeutic and transformative potential… An active imagination is the key to such a wide vision: it looks at life from angles that are not our own, imagining other levels of consciousness superior to our own.’ Alejandro Jodorowsky

Transformation is key to all of Jodorowsky’s creative endeavours and this comes to play big time in The Dance of Reality through the character of the father, Jaime (played by Alejandro’s oldest son Brontis), a stern disciplinarian who idolises Stalin, but who is just as much the tryant as his nemesis, Chile’s right-wing dictator, Carlos Ibáñez del Campo (Bastian Bodenhofer), whom he sets out to kill.

The Dance of Reality (2013)

Jaime’s journey is all about the destruction of the ego, and this is manifested in the paralysis of his hands when his assassination plan fails and Jaime is propelled on a path of enlightenment and, after many surreal setbacks, finally back into the waiting arms of his family: young son Alejandrito (Jeremías Herskovits) and wife Sara (played by Chilean opera soprano Pamela Flores, who sings all of her lines).

The Dance of Reality (2013)

Now, Jodorowsky could have portrayed his dad as a truly repulsive character, but instead gives him humanity – he’s both comical and sympathetic, and Brontis plays the granddad he never knew superbly. Jamie’s adventures – which sees him being rejected by his anti-Semitic peers, cast out of a shanty-town after the death of the hunchback dwarf who rescues him from the streets, and being tortured by the secret police – all lead to his rebirth (just like Jodorowsky’s gunfighter El Topo, the thief in The Holy Mountain and Fenix in Santa Sangre). It also serves to help Jodorowsky heal his own wounds in the process.

The Dance of Reality (2013)

Jodorowsky’s films are always loaded with symbols, requiring multiple viewing to catch them all, and his latest opus is no exception – with death (both the mortality and metaphysical kind) being key. One scene that sent a shiver down my spine and still haunts me even now is when Jodorowsky steps into the action to stop his younger self from committing suicide. It certainly struck an unconscious nerve within me (or was it a memory), and thus proof positive of the transformative power of Jodorowsky’s cinema. A sequel, Poesia Sin Fin (Endless Poetry), which follows the artist’s quest for inner truth, is currently in production. I can’t wait.

The Dance of Reality (aka La danza de la realidad) premieres on Film4 at 1am on Tuesday 19 January 2017, and is also available on Blu-ray from Artificial Eye in the UK

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Ganja & Hess (1973) | Hailed and damned and hailed again! Bill Gunn’s cult masterpiece now on Blu-ray in the UK

Ganja & Hess (1973)

Some marriages are made in heaven, others are made in hell!
While studying the ancient Mythria tribe of Africa, wealthy anthropologist Dr Hess Green (Duane Jones) is stabbed with a ceremonial dagger by his unstable new assistant George (Bill Gunn), endowing him with immortality and cursing him to drink human blood. Following George’s suicide, his sassy, no-nonsense wife Ganja (Marlene Clark) comes look for answers, but ends up finding a unexpected soul mate in Hess, which results in the couple’s ritualistic union. But when Hess finally decides to seek salvation in a bizarre act of self-exorcism, Ganja isn’t so willing to give up her newly acquired immortality…

Ganja & Hess (1973)

‘One of the most literate, allegorical, and evasive of all horror films’
David Walker & Tim Lucas, Video Watchdog

Before you sit down to watch this, be warned! Ganja & Hess is neither a blaxploitation film nor a vampire movie (which it was intended to be). It is, in fact, a hauntingly original, highly-stylised drama about sex, faith, addiction and African American identity. A cult film in the true sense of the word, its fractured history is the stuff of underground cinema legend.

Ganja & Hess (1973)

US playwright Bill Gunn was in the right place and the right time when he was handed US$350,000 to make his debut feature. But though he was supposed to have made a blaxploitation horror to ride on the cape and coat-tails of Blacula and its sequel (reviewed here), he ended up giving his producers an enigmatic meditation on addiction with an improvised Bergmanesque bent and an newly-radicalised African American agenda. It earned rave reviews at Cannes, but wasn’t what the producers ordered. They responded by re-editing it (excising all of the arty bits) and releasing it as Blood Couple (as well as Double Possession and Back Vampire amongst others) for the drive-in and grindhouse circuits. Gunn was furious. And so should have been.

Ganja & Hess (1973)

Gunn’s marginalised masterpiece ended up fading into obscurity, while the director himself died prematurely in 1989 (from encephalitis). But thanks to film historian David Kalat, a director’s cut of the film was eventually released in 1998, followed by a HD version in the US under the Kino label. Now, the film gets it UK debut on Blu-ray and DVD from Eureka! Entertainment.

Ganja & Hess (1973)

An important work in African-American cinema, Ganja & Hess is much more than just a failed horror movie experiment. Inspired by Gunn’s vision, film-maker Spike Lee has even filmed a remake, entitled Da Sweet Blood of Jesus, which hits US cinemas in February 2015.

Ganja & Hess is certainly difficult to digest in one sitting (especially the lengthy monologues), but it’s worth the effort. The images are many and multi-layered, fired by the director’s imagination and intellectual agenda; while the soundtrack is a fusion of soul and gospel, droning psychedelia, and primal screaming. The 16mm and 35mm film stocks used give the images a hazy, dreamlike quality that’s entirely suited to Gunn’s maverick style. And its worth noting that both George Romero’s Martin (1977) and Abel Ferrara’s The Addiction (1995) share its gritty low-budget look and vampiric/addiction themes.

Ganja & Hess (1973)

Cult film fans will  recognise Duane Jones from Romero’s Night of the Living Dead. He was actually working as a teacher at the time and only did the film as a favour for Gunn; while the guy playing Ganja’s well-endowed lover was in fact a teacher friend of Johnson’s. Ganja & Hess (yes it is a play on the word hash) is a must-have for any serious cult film collection.

Ganja & Hess (1973)

THE UK DUAL FORMAT RELEASE
Ganja & Hess is available on Dual Format (Blu-ray & DVD) from 26 January 2015 in the UK from Eureka! Entertainment, and this what you get:
• 1080p high-definition transfer of the original 16mm film elements, presented in its original 1.66:1 aspect ratio
• Optional English subtitles
• Audio commentary, recorded in 1998, with producer Chiz Schultz, actress Marlene Clark, cinematographer James Hinton and composer Sam Waymon . This is hugely informative and very entertaining, and helps fill in those gaps about the what the film is about. It was also included on the 2012 Kino release.
• Select scene commentary with David Kalat
The Blood of the Thing. David Kalat leads a 29-min interview-based documentary. Very basic, but informative. It also appeared on the Kino release.
• Gunn’s original screenplay available via DVD-Rom and BD-Rom.
• Reversible Sleeve
• 24-page booklet featuring an essay on the history of the film and a vintage letter written by Gunn to the New York Times in 1973.

Mood Indigo (2013) | Michel Gondry’s French romantic fantasy has a big heart

Mood Indigo (2013)

Romance and tragedy collide in this French fantasy drama from Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind director Michel Gondry, who puts a personal spin on Boris Vian’s 1947 novel L’ecume Des Jours (aka Froth on the Daydream) about an idealistic man of means, Colin (Romain Duris), who meets and marries the quirky Chloé (Audrey Tautou), only to have his world fall apart when Chloé discovers a water lily is growing on her lung.

Mood Indigo (2013)

Set in Paris in an undefined time period (although its heavily inspired by Gondry’s memory of the city in the 1970s), Mood Indigo (which gets its name from the 1930 Duke Ellington jazz tune) is a joy to watch and listen to from beginning to end – even if you aren’t familiar with Vian’s much-loved post-surrealist comedy (it comes in at number 10 in Le Monde’s 100 Books of the Century). But it is a plus to have someone French on hand to get all the cultural references – like the character Jean-Sol Partre being a spoonerism of existentialist Jean-Paul Sartre.

Mood Indigo (2013)

The absurd visuals are wonderfully inventive: a doorbell turns into an indestructible millipede; a piano becomes a musical cocktail maker; colourful dishes of meat, fruit and veg dance, jump and squirm when touched; then there’s the weirdly erotic Biglemoi dance that is straight out of a 1930s Silly Symphony cartoon. And they all serve to breathe life into Vian’s anarchic source material, which has been filmed twice before and also served as the inspiration for an opera.

Mood Indigo (2013)

But unlike it’s whimsical counterpart, 2001’s Amélie (which famously launched Tautou on the international scene), it’s not all fun and froth for this boy-meets-girl love story which turns morbidly monochrome when Chloe’s sickness takes hold and the couple’s apartment literally falls apart before their very eyes. Think La bohème as made by the Brothers Quay. The film’s fatalistic themes stay true to Vian’s novel, while most of the narrative also stays intact, including the parallel storyline about the Partre-obsessed Chick and his girlfriend Alise. Colin’s pet mouse, however, does get a reprieve (he commits suicide in the book) and provides the film with a colourful glow of hope in the closing scenes.

Mood Indigo is out now on DVD and Blu-ray in the UK from Studiocanal

You and the Night (2013) | This lyrical paean to love, death and sexual prowess is an outré delight

You and the Night (2013)

Around midnight, a stylish young couple and their transgender maid prepare for an orgy. Their guests will be The Slut, The Star, The Stud and The Teen. Each comes with their own dark and impassioned secrets, unravelled in flashbacks and admissions, in a night they’ll never forget…

You and the Night (2013)

The spirit of underground arthouse cinema lurks within the sensual stylings of this surreal arthouse oddity from writer-director Yann Gonzales, whose feature debut was met with mixed reviews on its original cinema release earlier this year. But I love it (I’ve seen it three times already) and I am totally turned on by the shimmering score by French electronic band M83.

You and the Night (2013)

Taking place within a vast Brutalist building set in a wintery woodland, Gonzales’ existential dream play, Les recontres d’apres minuit (in the original French), follows seven characters who, over the course of a night of debauchery and soul-searching, have their emotional wounds healed through their contact with each other. Imagine fusing The Breakfast Club, The Hunger, Jean Cocteau’s Orphée and Tales from the Crypt with some Pedro Almodóvar kitsch and some Bava/Argento-styled giallo, all set within an über cool 1980s aesthetic, and you’ll be on the mark.

You and the Night (2013)

Our hosts Ali (Kate Moran) and Matthias (Niels Schneider) are lovers granted eternal youth by Udo (Nicolas Maury), a transgender witch who brought Matthias back to life in exchange for the couple’s undying love. But Matthias is suffering terrible nightmares, which threatens to upset the threesome’s centuries-old union. Their orgy is a way of forgetting reality, but ends up becoming much more for them and their guests.

The cock-hungry Slut (Julie Brémond) is a lonely soul grieving over never having her mother’s love; the self-conscious Star (Fanienne Babe) reveals an incestuous secret that may just be a fantasy; the well-hung Stud (Eric Cantona) is in search of poetry as well as prowess; and the sex-addicted Teen (Alain-Fabien Delon) desperately wants a loving family to take him in.

You and the Night (2013)

While it looses by points going all introspective at the halfway mark (like a bad come down after an acid trip) and playing it safe with the tantric sex orgy scene, You and the Night is peppered with echoes of cinema’s arthouse past that make it a visually arresting delight. Its the reason why I love it so.

The opening motorbike dream sequence is lifted from Alain Robbe-Grillet’s 1983 erotic drama La belle captive; the stormy setting and sexual antics smacks of the 1975 black comedy Thundercrack!; the prison setting where The Stud gets whipped by Dalle dressed as Ilsa the Tigress of Siberia has a minimalist Derek Jarman look; and Ali and Matthias’ story is told in hyper-real flashback à la Fassbinder’s Querelle. The sparkling diamond dress worn by The Star, meanwhile, could almost be a copy of Delphine Seyrig’s gown in Harry Kümel’s Daughters of Darkness. Intentional or not, it’s the most fun I’ve had watching a movie in ages. Now if only that sensory jukebox was a reality.

You and the Night is released on DVD on 24 November in the UK from Peccadillo Pictures

The Beast (1975) | Is Walerian Borowczyk’s horny black farce the most outrageous erotic fantasy ever committed to film?

Walerian Borowcyzk's The Beast

The night before her wedding, American heiress Lucy Broadhurst (Sirpa Lane) arrives at her aristocratic fiancé’s secluded French country estate and learns about a legendary beast that stalks the nearby woods. That night she dreams of an erotic encounter with the half-man half-beast…

MONDO MONSTRO!
This bizarre, yet beautifully shot erotic fairytale is Walerian Borowczyk’s most notorious film. Expanded from the planned Immoral Tales segment, The Beast (The Bête) sees the director at his most extreme. In turns silly, nasty, comic, disturbing and (for those of in the back row) voyueristically arousing, it cemented Borowczyk’s reputation as the ‘arty pornographer’, which began after he showed his vintage erotica short A Private Collection and an early version of Immoral Tales in 1974.

With its heavy overtures of bestiality and blatant appropriation of pornographic images, its no wonder censors around the world took a hefty pair of scissors to it or banned it outright. But, ever the provocateur, Borowczyk had a wry smile at the censors and his critics, because lurking behind what must be the most outrageous erotic fantasy ever committed to film is a playful satire on sex and desire.

Walerian Borowcyzk's The Beast

THE UK DUAL FORMAT RELEASE
Receiving its Blu-ray world premiere, this new 2k high-definition restoration by Argos Films. The Arrow Films dual format release (which includes a standard definition DVD) includes the following elements…
• New high definition digital transfers of the feature and the shorts, with uncompressed mono 2.0 PCM audio and optional English subtitles
• Introduction by film critic Peter Bradshaw (2014)
The Making of The Beast (2014), camera operator Noël Véry provides a commentary on footage shot during the film’s production
Frenzy of Ecstasy: The Evolution of the Beast, (2014), visual essay on the evolution of Borowczyk’s beast and the sequel that never was, Motherhood
Venus on the Half-Shell (1975), Borowczyk’s portrait of the painter Bona Tibertelli de Pisis and her erotic fusions of men, women and molluscs
• Original trailer

Goto, Island of Love (1968) | Walerian Borowczyk’s allegorical comic tragedy is a grave beauty

Goto Isle of Love (1

On a mythical island that has been cut off from civilisation by an earthquake, melancholic dictator Goto III (Pierre Brasseur) rules with a iron fist, but power-hungry petty thief Grozo (Guy Saint-Jean) hatches a devious plot to win the heart of Glossia (Ligia Branice), Goto’s beautiful wife. But Grozo’s plans go terribly wrong when he finally gets his hands on Glossia and the island…

Goto Isle of Love

BONKERS AND BIZARRE
This French allegorical comic tragedy from cult director Walerian Borowczyk was the Polish filmmaker’s first live-action feature, but retains all of the surreal imaginings of his magnificent shorts and 1967 animated feature Mr & Mrs Kabal’s Theatre (also available from Arrow). Featuring bizarre sets, a bonkers fetishtic sex and death scenario, and brilliant blarring deployment of one of Handel’s organ concertos, Goto, Isle of Love is an acutely conceived nightmare where power and lust festers, breeds and rules in absurdity. The film was also a thinly veiled attack on totalitarianism, which famously got it banned in Communist Poland and Fascist Spain (much the director’s delight), and is feminist author Angela Carter’s favourite film. Noted French actor Pierre Brasseur, who plays the sad-eyed dictator, is best known for appearing in such classic French fare as Marcel Carné’s Les Enfants du Paradis (1945) and Georges Franju’s Eyes Without a Face (1960).

THE UK DUAL FORMAT RELEASE
Goto, Isle of Love is presented by Arrow Films in a brand new 2k high-definition restoration from the original 35mm interpositive and includes the colour sequences that were often omitted from earlier releases. The release also includes the following element…
• Uncompressed mono 2.0 PCM Audio and optional English subtitles
• Introduction by artist and Turner Prize nominee Craigie Horsfield
The Concentration Universe: Making Goto, Isle of Love (2014), interview programme featuring actor Jean-Pierre Andréani, cameraman Noël Véry and camera assistant Jean-Pierre Platel
The Profligate Door: Borowczyk’s Sound Sculptures (2014), documentary featuring curator Maurice Corbet

Available from Arrow Films from 8 September 2014

The Short Films (1959-1984) & Theatre of Mr and Mrs Kabal (1967) | Welcome to the surreal world of Dadaist prankster Walerian Borowczyk

Borowczyk-Shorts

Following the sell-out successful release of Arrow Academy’s Camera Obscura: The Walerian Borowczyk Collection, which brings together all of the key works from the Polish film-maker’s career, five of his most provocative features as well as his shorts and animation have been released individually on Blu-ray and DVD for the first time in a new 2k digital high definition restoration.

Walerian Borowczyk's Astronaut
THE SHORTS
For the first decade of his film-making career, former colourist artist Walerian Borowczyk made short animated films in his native Poland and then in France, where he settled in the 1950s. This disc includes the majority of the shorts that he made between 1959 and 1984, including the acclaimed surrealist cut-out Astronauts, and the extraordinary Angel’s Games, which was hugely influential on likes of Jan Svankmajer, David Lynch and Terry Gilliam, who selected it as one of the best 10 animated films of all time and supplies the introduction to this release.

The Theatre of Mr & Mrs Kabal
THE THEATRE OF MR & MRS KABAL
In 1967, Borowczyk made his feature debut, the grotesque, surreal animated fantasy, The Theatre of Mr & Mrs Kabal. Rendered in mainly monochrome graphics it’s the polar opposite of Disney’s saccharine features, and is a key film in understanding Borowczyk as a master craftsman and Dadaist prankster.

Walerian Borowczyk
THE UK DUAL FORMAT RELEASE
• Brand new 2K restorations of Borowczyk short films are presented in brand new high-definition restorations from original 35mm elements, with uncompressed mono 2.0 PCM audio and optional English subtitles.
Theatre of Mr and Mrs Kabal (1967, 73min): This strangely moving existential soap opera does away with conventional narrative (and dialogue) to evoke the highs and lows of married life. Bizarre, grotesque and strangely moving.
Astronauts (1959, 14min): With its jerky cutout figures and groundbreaking abstract photorealistic backgrounds, this is ‘a masterpiece of surrealist incongruity’. Credited as being co-directed by cine-essayist Chris Marker, whose main contribution was actually the loan of his owl, Anabase.
The Concert (1962, 6min): Mr and Mrs Kabal give a very lively concert performance.
Grandmother’s Encyclopaedia in 13 Parts (1963, 6min): Borowczyk animates cut outs from Victorian encyclopaedias and novels to comic and surrealistic effect.
Renaissance (1963): Featuring wrecked, handmade objects gradually reconstructing themselves into a still life composition before exploding once more, this was Borowczyk’s signature work.
Angels’ Games (1964, 12min): Regarded as Borowczyk’s great masterpiece, it evokes de Chirico and Magritte to describe the concentration universe of death camps and the Gulag, and succeeds in elevating animation into the realm of fine arts.
Joachim’s Dictionary (1965, 9min): Joachim defines a succession of 26 audiovisual definitions to suggest a doomed attempt at mastering the absurdities of the world.
Rosalie (1966, 15min): Based on a short story by Guy de Maupassant, Borowczyk’s favourite film relates the plight of a servant girl (played by Ligia Borowczyk) who confesses to smothering her offspring.
Gavotte (1967, 10min): Two bored dwarves fight over a cushion. Completely wordless, Borowczyk takes his dramatic cue from a gavotte by Jean-Philippe Rameau, played on a harpsichord off camera.
Diptych (1967, 8min): Two seemingly distinct ‘panels’ combine to make a unified whole.
The Phonograph (1969, 6min): In this companion piece to Renaissance, an old phonograph assembles itself and plays songs on wax drums before self-destructing.
The Greatest Love of All Time (1978, 10min): A minimalist documentary portrait of Serbia’s erotic surrealist painter Ljubomir Popovic, to the tune of Richard Wagner’s Tannhauser.
Scherzo Infernal (1984, 5min): Depicts a harshly sensual world in the fiery inferno of Hell as a nubile angel has a chance encounter with a rebel devil.
• Introduction by Terry Gilliam (2013)
Film is Not a Sausage (2014), documentary about Borowczyk’s animation featuring Borowczyk, producer Dominique Duvergé-Ségrétin, assistant André Heinrich and composer Bernard Parmegiani
Blow Ups (2014), a visual essay by Daniel Bird about Borowczyk’s works on paper
Commercials (1963-64): Holy Smoke (1963), The Museum (1964), Tom Thumb (1966)
• Reversible sleeve featuring original poster designs
• Collector’s booklet

Walerian Borowczyk

Nick Cave’s critically-acclaimed 20,000 Days on Earth gets a sold-out UK premiere and gala satellite event

20,000 Days on Earth (2014)

20,000 Days on Earth takes an avant-garde look into the life and creative mind of legendary Australian muso, author, screenwriter and occasional actor Nick Cave over a period of 24 hours. Directed by Iain Forsyth and Jane Pollard, the film gets its formal UK premiere at the sold out Film4 Summer Screen at Somerset House in London tonight.

This will be followed by a very special gala preview at London’s Barbican on 17 September. The red-carpet event, featuring a screening of the film plus a unique 60-minute live experience that includes a live performance with Nick Cave, Warren Ellis and Barry Adamson and a Q&A with the 20,000 Days on Earth creative team, will be broadcast live via satellite to over 150 cinemas across the UK. 20,000 Days on Earth then goes on general release across the UK and Ireland from 19 September.

20,000 Days on Earth (2014)

This critically-acclaimed film first debuted at the Sundance and Berlin festivals earlier in the year, winning the Sundance Best Direction and Best Editing prizes in the World Cinema Documentary section. According to the UK preview event organisers, ‘20,000 Days on Earth is a bold vision of one of music’s most mysterious and charismatic figures, the iconic Nick Cave. In their debut feature directors Iain Forsyth and Jane Pollard fuse drama and documentary by weaving a cinematically staged day in Cave’s life with never-before-seen verité observation of his full creative cycle’.

If you haven’t been lucky enough to score a ticket for the Barbican event, you can enjoy the experience live at Picturehouse Cinemas and selected Curzon, Everyman, Cineworld, Vue, Odeon and Showcase cinemas as a host of independent cinemas across the UK.

Check out the 20,000 Days on Earth website (click here)

Nick Cave at Proud CamdenAND ALSO…  If you head over to Proud Galleries Camden in north London from 3 September to 2 November you catch their next exhibition Nick Cave: Chasing The Myth featuring a collection of portraits of the enigmatic front man that span his musical career. Bringing together shots from David Corio, Andrew Whitton, Steve Double, and Amelia Troubridge: photographers whom each worked with Cave at different stages of his artistic development, up to the present day, the exhibition is a revealing and intimate portrait of one of rock’s few singular personalities. (click here for more info)

 

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