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The Naked Civil Servant (1975) | John Hurt’s Bafta-winning turn as gay icon Quentin Crisp restored in HD

The Naked Civil Servant (1975))

Originally broadcast on UK TV in December 1975, this Bafta-winning adaptation of Quentin Crisp’s best-selling autobiography, The Naked Civil Servant, boasts a career-best performance by the late John Hurt as Crisp – a flamboyant south London engineer’s tracer turned artist’s model living an openly gay lifestyle during the intolerant pre-war years, where he proudly challenges the authorities that seek to suppress him and his kind.

Blackly comic, poignant and yet also life-affirming, this courageous story about a very unconventional British eccentric is masterfully directed by Jack Gold (The Medusa Touch, Escape from Sobibor), from a screenplay by Philip Mackie (TV’s Raffles), and executive produced by Doctor Who’s Verity Lambert.

It also boasts some colourful turns from the likes of Shane Briant as a cross dressing male prostitute called Norma and Patricia Hodge as an Isadora Duncan-styled ballet teacher. But kudos go to Stanley Lebor as the tragic Mr Pole (his descent into madness will have you reaching for some tissues).

One of the most significant LGBT British-made TV dramas of all time, the Thames Television production gave Hurt his first Best Actor Bafta and turned Crisp into an instant international celebrity and a gay icon.

The self-proclaimed ‘Stately Homo’ was hailed as a modern-day Oscar Wilde due to his aphoristic witticisms which led him into creating a successful one-man show and publishing further works including 1996’s Resident Alien (which inspired 2009’s An Englishman in New York, also with John Hurt). Crisp died, aged 91, in 1999.

Check out his archives here: http://www.crisperanto.org/index1.html

Voted fourth in BFI’s Top 100 TV programmes of 20th Century, The Naked Civil Servant has been restored in high-definition from the original film elements.

With 2017 marking the 50th anniversary of the 1967 Sexual Offences Act, it’s the perfect time time revisit the film, which also gets a special cinema screening on 28 May at a number of selected venues nationwide part of Picturehouse Cinemas’ Criminal Acts season. For more information go to: https://www.picturehouses.com/film/the-naked-civil-servant

Out on Blu-ray and DVD from Network on June 5 2017

THE NETWORK RELEASE
• HD feature version (HD Blu-ray exclusive), restored from the original film elements and presented in its original 1:33:1 picture ratio with the ad-breaks removed
• Commentary with John Hurt, director Jack Gold and executive producer Verity Lambert
Seven Men: Quentin Crisp – a Granada profile from 1971
Mavis Catches Up with Quentin Crisp: an interview from 1989
• Image gallery
• Philip Mackie’s original script (PDF)

ALSO… CHECK OUT THIS UNRESTORED VIDEO OF QUENTIN CRISP’S ONE-MAN SHOW

 

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Universal’s Complete Legacy Collection | Four Classic Monsters Blu-ray Box Sets featuring 22 HD firsts

Universal Classic Horror Legacy Collection

Universal Pictures’ stable of classic monsters featuring Frankenstein (and his creature), Dracula (and his kin), the Mummy (and his tanna leaf-chewing disciples) and the Wolfman (and his brood) have all been unleashed again onto Blu-ray in the UK in four new box sets containing 27 classic creepies, (*22 of them Blu-ray firsts) and all digitally restored so that fans, both old and new, can witness just why this monster club remains one of cinemas finest creations.

Now, back in 2012, I rushed out and bought the Universal Classic Monsters: The Essential Collection featuring 8 classics and a host of bonus content. It was a beautiful release featuring all my old favourites gorgeously restored. This one includes many of those special features (all marked ! below), but the big plus is including ALL of the sequels of each of the four monster legacies.

Mind you, there’s no Invisible Man, Creature from the Black Lagoon or Phantom of the Opera this time round, but hopefully Universal will eventually release them under their Complete Legacy Collection banner – which will be most welcomed by film completists like myself.

So here’s what you get… (*) is new to Blu-ray

The Frankenstein Legacy Collection

Frankenstein (1931), Bride of Frankenstein (1935), Son of Frankenstein* (1939), Ghost of Frankenstein* (1942), Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man* (1943), House of Frankenstein* (1944), House of Dracula* (1945), and Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein* (1948)

Special Features
• 100 Years of Universal: Restoring the Classics!
• The Frankenstein Files: How Hollywood Made A Monster!
• Karloff: The Gentle Monster!
• Monster Tracks (subtitle file, interactive pop-up facts about the making of Frankenstein)!
• Universal Horror (narrated by Kenneth Branagh)!
• Frankenstein Archives!
• Boo!: A Short Film!
• Feature Commentary With Film Historian Rudy Behlmer!
• Feature Commentary With Historian Sir Christopher Frayling!
• 100 Years of Universal: Restoring the Classics!
• She’s Alive! Creating the Bride of Frankenstein!
• The Bride of Frankenstein Archives!
• The Bride of Frankenstein commentary with Scott MacQueen!
• 100 Years of Universal: The Lot!
• 100 Years of Universal: Unforgettable Characters
• Abbott And Costello Meet The Monsters
• Abbott And Costello Theatrical Trailer
• Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein commentary With Film Historian Gregory W. Mank

The Dracula Legacy Collection

Dracula (1931), Dracula’s Daughter* (1936), Son of Dracula* (1943), House of Frankenstein* (1944), House of Dracula* (1945) and Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein* (1948)

Special Features
• Dracula (1931) Spanish Version!
• Introduction to the Spanish Version by Lupita Tovar Kohner!
• Dracula: The Restoration!
• The Road To Dracula!
• Lugosi: The Dark Prince!
• Feature Commentary by Film Historian David J. Skal!
• Alternate Score By Philip Glass with the Kronos Quartet!
• Four Unrestored Trailers!
• Dracula Archives!
• Monster Tracks Pop-Up Facts (subtitle file)!
• 100 Years of Universal: The Lot!
• 100 Years of Universal: Unforgettable Characters
• Abbott And Costello Meet The Monsters
• Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein commentary With Film Historian Gregory W Mank

The Wolf Man Legacy Collection

The Wolf Man (1941), She-Wolf of London* (1946), Werewolf of London* (1935), Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man* (1943), House of Frankenstein* (1944), House of Dracula* (1945) and Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein* (1948)

Special Features
• Centennial Trailer
• 100 Years of Universal: The Lot!
• Monsters By Moonlight!
• The Wolf Man: From Ancient Curse to Modern Myth!
• Pure In Heart: The Life and Legacy of Lon Chaney Jr.!
• He Who Made Monsters: The Life and Art of Jack Pierce!
• The Wolf Man Archives!
• Feature Commentary with Film Historian Tom Weaver!
• 100 Years of Universal: Unforgettable Characters
• Abbott And Costello Meet The Monsters
• Abbott And Costello Theatrical Trailer
• Abbot and Costello Meet Frankenstein Commentary with Film Historian Gregory W. Mank

The Mummy Legacy Collection

The Mummy (1932), The Mummy’s Hand* (1940), The Mummy’s Tomb* (1942), The Mummy’s Ghost* (1944), The Mummy’s Curse*, (1944), and Abbott and Costello Meet the Mummy* (1955)

Special Features
• The Mummy Feature Commentary with Film Historian Paul Jensen!
• Mummy Dearest Featurette!
• He Who Made Monsters: The Life and Art of Jack Pierce!
• Universal Horror (narrated by Kenneth Branagh)
• Unravelling the Legacy of the Mummy!

 

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Melody (1971) | This enchanting tale of first love and youthful rebellion is no longer a forgotten gem

Melody (1971)

‘A forgotten, inspiring gem’ Wes Anderson

Set against the backdrop of a 1970s south London comprehensive school, Melody was director Alan Parker’s debut screenplay and his first film collaboration with producer David Puttnam, and it reunited Mark Lester and Jack Wild, who starred in the 1968 musical film adaptation of Oliver!, alongside 11-year-old Tracy Hyde making her acting debut.

Melody (1971)

Quiet, well-behaved Daniel (Lester) and cheeky troublemaker Ornshaw (Wild) could not be more different but they become the best of friends. That is, until Daniel spots Melody (Tracy Hyde) at the school disco.

The boys’ friendship becomes jeopardised, as Ornshaw grows jealous when his Daniel seems more interested in a hanging out with a girl. Initially embarrassed by the attention, Melody comes to return Daniel’s feelings, and the couple announce to their parents, teachers and friends that they want to get married and now.

The adults attempt to dissuade them, but Daniel and Melody’s determination leads Ornshaw to have a change of heart. He and their classmates gather together at one of the children’s hideouts to ‘marry’ the couple, with their discovery leading to a final riotous, no-holds-barred showdown where the children stick it to the grown-ups…

Melody (1971)

The film was the brainchild of Puttnam, who had secured the rights to five Bee Gees songs and wanted to craft a movie around it. Drawing on the lyrics of those songs, as well as the Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young hit ‘Teach Your Children’, Parker’s script captured what it was like to be a kid on the brink of adolescence in 1970s Britain, drawing inspiration from his and Puttnam’s own school experiences, and these are brought to vivid life by Warris Hussein (Doctor Who) and cinematographer Peter Suschitzky (A History of Violence), who make excellent use of the Lambeth and Soho locations.

Melody (1971)

While it scored huge success in Japan and South America when it was released in 1971, Melody – which would not have been made if not for some unlikely support in the guise of Joan Collins – got a lukewarm reception both at home and in the US (mostly on account of its poor promotion and being given the awkward title of S.W.A.L.K. (aka Sealed With A Loving Kiss).

But it has since grown into something of a cult, with director Wes Anderson using it as the inspiration for his film, Moonrise Kingdom, while Gravity director Alfonso Cuaron cites the film as the inspiration for him going into film-making.

Melody (1971)

Having finally watched in myself, I can guarantee that your heart will swell and you’ll have tears in your eyes as you see the world again through the eyes of these youngsters. It might paint a rosy view of inner city London life in the 1970s, but it will nevertheless bring much joy and contemplation about a much more innocent time. And the songs are so catchy, I went out and hunted down the original soundtrack.

Melody is available now on DVD, Blu-ray and EST as part of Studiocanal’s Vintage Classics Collection, and includes as special features, interviews with Lord David Puttnam, Sir Alan Parker, Waris Hussein and Mark Lester; plus a stills gallery.

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Das Cabinet des Dr Caligari (1920) gets a Steelbook Edition release

 Das Cabinet des Dr. Caligari

One of the most iconic masterpieces in cinema history, Robert Wiene’s Das Cabinet des Dr. Caligari shook filmgoers worldwide and changed the direction of the art form.

Incalculably influential, the film’s nightmarishly jagged sets, sinister atmospheric and psychological emphasis left an immediate impact in its wake (horror, film noir, and gothic cinema would all be shaped directly by it).

Das Cabinet des Dr. Caligari

Das Cabinet des Dr. Caligari (1920)

Back in 2014, Eureka! released the definitive restoration on dual format as part of their Masters of Cinema Series, now the expressionist masterpiece is back in a special Steelbook Blu-ray edition, which includes the 2014 documentary, From Caligari to Hitler, a two-hour exploration of German Cinema during the Weimar Republic (1918-1933). Plus, there’s a host of brand-new bonus extras to savour.

From Caligari to Hitler

From Caligari to Hitler

WHAT’S IN THE BOX
• High-definition presentation, from the extensive FWMS restoration
• Option of Stereo and 5.1 surround scores
• Original German intertitles with optional English subtitles
From Caligari to Hitler: German Cinema in the Age of the Masses
You Must Become Caligari: Video essay by film critic David Cairns
• Exclusive audio commentary by film historian David Kalat
Caligari: The Birth of Horror in the First World War: 52 minute documentary on the cultural and historical impact of the film
On the Restoration: three short video pieces on the film’s restoration
• Trailer for the release of the new restoration of the film
• Booklet featuring vintage writing on the film by Lotte H Eisner; an original Variety review of the film; and rare archival imagery

GET IT NOW FROM AMAZON

 

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Here Comes Mr Jordan (1941) | The supernatural Hollywood classic is comic perfection and a must-see on Blu-ray

Here Comes Mr Jordan (1941)

Nominated for seven Oscars (and winning two for its story and screenplay) and the inspiration for a slew of guardian angel pictures, including a 1947 sequel, Down to Earth with Rita Hayworth, and two remakes, as Heaven Can Wait, director Alexander Hall’s delightfully droll 1941 fantasy, Here Comes Mr Jordan, is comic perfection.

Here Comes Mr Jordan (1941)


When working-class boxer Joe Pendleton (Robert Montgomery) dies in a plane crash, he finds himself arriving in heaven 50 years too early owing to a clerical error by an over-zealous chief dispatcher’s messenger (Edward Everett Horton).

On discovering his body has been cremated, his angelic minder, Mr Jordan (Claude Rains) fixes it that so that he can return to Earth using the body of crooked banker Bruce Farnsworth, who’s just been murdered by his adulterous wife (Rita Johnson) and secretary (John Emery).

Falling in love with the daughter of one of his duped investors (Evelyn Keyes), Joe tries to remake Farnsworth’s unworthy life, while also trying to stop a world championship prizefight from being thrown by gamblers…


Here Comes Mr Jordan (1941)

Robert Montgomery makess for a believable and solid everyman hero as the boxer given a second chance, while Claude Rains gives great support, as do James Gleason as Joe’s boxer manager and Evelyn Keyes as the breezy love interest. But it’s Edward Everett Horton who steals the show as the dithering Messenger 7013. Sweet, sophisticated and super smooth – they certainly don’t make them like this any more – and its prime a slice of Hollywood’s golden age that deserves pride of place in any classic film fan’s collection.

Here Comes Mr Jordan (1941)

The Criterion Collection Blu-ray release features a new 2K digital restoration, which really makes Joseph Walker’s diffused cinematography zing, and includes the following extras…

• Critic Michael Sragow and filmmaker Michael Schlesinger discuss the film and its influence.
• Audio interview from 1991 in which Elizabeth Montgomery (who died in 1995) looks back at her relationship with her staunch Republican actor father Robert Montgomery (1:19min).
• 1942 Lux Radio Theatre adaptation starring Cary Grant, Claude Rains, Evelyn Keyes and James Gleason.
• Trailer.
• Essay by critic Farran Smith Nehme.
• New artwork by Caitlin Kuhwald.

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Tales From the Crypt and Vault of Horror | An Amicus double bill on Blu-ray

Tales From the Crypt | Vault of Horror Blu-ray

From Final Cut Entertainment in the UK comes a double-bill of classic Amicus horror anthologies to make you shiver!!!!

First up is Tales From the Crypt. Directed with finesse by Freddie Francis, this 1972 British creeper was the fourth horror anthology to come from Milton Subotsky and Max Rosenburg’s Amicus outfit, and it remains a classic of its kind thanks to the sterling performances of an all-star cast and the five genuinely macabre stories, inspired by the original EC Comics, which still have the power to chill.

Vault of Horror (1973)

Subotsky drew on five more tales for the following year’s Vault of Horror, Amicus’ penultimate entry in their horror anthology cycle. Asylum director Roy Ward Baker was called in after original choice Freddie Francis (who helmed the first four entries) declined to oversee a mixed bag of horror and humour, which upped the horror quota, and boasted another starry line-up. You can read more HERE.

The extras on this new Blu-ray, which uses the same uncut transfer that Shout!/Scream Factory put out as part of their 2014 double bill, includes a 36-minute featurette featuring interviews with the likes of Jonathan Rigby, Reece Shearsmith and Steve Chibnall.

Available from Amazon from Monday 5 December 2016

 

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Nightmare (1964) | Hammer’s unsung psychological thriller is a heart-pounding game of two halves!

Nightmare (1964)Best known for her roles in the 1960s classics, Women in Love and Dr Who & the Daleks, British actress Jennie Linden made her big-screen debut in Hammer’s 1964’s Nightmare, which get its first-ever UK Blu-ray release from Final Cut Entertainment.

Nightmare (1964)

Aged just 23 at the time, Sussex-born Linden was hand-picked by Hammer’s producers to replace Julie Christie for the role of troubled teenager Janet ,who is haunted by memories of witnessing her mother killing her father when she was a child.

Expelled from boarding school, Janet is sent home to High Towers, a vast country mansion, to live with her guardian Henry Baxter (David Knight). But when the nightmares persist, Janet starts to loose her mind…

Nightmare (1964)

Originally given a title that gave away the film’s shock reveal 45-minutes into the story, Nightmare was Hammer’s fourth psychological thriller to be written by Jimmy Sangster, who wanted to move away from the Gothic horrors he was best known for.

Like 1961’s Scream of Fear, 1962’s Paranoiac and 1963’s The Maniac, Nightmare shares its DNA with Henri-Georges Clouzot’s Les Diaboliques and Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho, while returning director Freddie Francis and Hammer’s in-house production crew imbues the gripping mystery with lashings of atmosphere, especially those initial 45-minutes, where the film’s Grand Guignol horror tropes come out to play.

The film’s second half, which plays like a straightforward whodunnit, may not be as polished as those early scenes in which an excellent Linden brings pathos and hysteria to the fore, but it does give Moira Redmond, playing Janet’s nurse with a hidden agenda, a chance to strut her stuff.

Keen eyed fans might recognise actress Clytie Jessop, who plays David Knight’s scarred wife – she was the spectral Miss Jessel in The Innocents.

Nightmare (1964)

This cracking little chiller originally went out in a double-bill with The Evil of Frankenstein, but has remained in the shadows of its better known siblings, like Paranoiac! This new Blu-ray release, however, which looks and sounds superb, is the perfect opportunity to pay it a revisit, and hopefully gain a new appreciation. It also benefits from three insightful extras.

Nightmare (1964)Jennie Linden Memories: A lovely 13-minute chat with the actress – who famously dared to say ‘No’ to Ken Russell – conducted at her home on the Isle of Wight.

Madhouse: Inside Hammers Nightmare: A 13-minute look at production with insights from The Hammer Story author Kevin Barnes, English Gothic author Jonathan Rigby and others.

Nightmare (1964)Nightmare in the Making (26min): Hammer historian Wayne Kinsey retraces the history of the thriller from concept to release, and includes archive interviews with screenwriter Jimmy Sangster, art director Don Mingaye and actress Jennie Linden (using elements not used in her own interview).

Available from Amazon

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Jinnah (1998) | Christopher Lee gives the performance of a lifetime as Pakistan’s revered founding father

Jinnah (1998)

Few individuals significantly alter the course of history. Fewer still modify the map of the world. Hardly anyone can be credited with creating a nation-state. Muhammad Ali Jinnah did all three

So wrote Stanley Wolpert in his acclaimed 1984 biography of Muhammad Ali Jinnah, the man who was almost single-handedly responsible for splitting Pakistan from India. A source of much controversy throughout its making, this 1998 biopic from Pakistani-French indie film-maker Jamil Dehlavi opened to great acclaim in Pakistan but has never been available in the English-speaking world – until now.

Christopher Lee as Jinnah

Following his death on 11 September 1948, Muhammad Ali Jinnah (Christopher Lee) awaits final judgement in the afterlife and must tell the story of his life, before his celestial minder (Shashi Kapoor). His story covers the intense political strife and bloody events that led to the formation of the Muslim nation, starting in 1947 as Lord Mountbatten (James Fox) uses his diplomatic whiles to persuade Mahatma Gandhi (Sam Dastor) and Jawaharlal Nehru (Robert Ashby) to join in his effort to stop Jinnah’s homeland campaign…

jinnah (1998)

This is a lavishly mounted, intensely moving, piece of cinema. If you’re not offended by an English actor playing a Pakistani, then Lee certainly delivers one of the finest performances of his career. It’s certainly the one that he was most proud of – he even bears much countenance to the revered real-life statesman, not only in appearance, but also in some of the character traits that are explored in his inventive biopic that not only addresses Jinnah the politician, but also the man – especially his regrets in his personal relationships with his two wives and daughter, Dina. My other best acting vote goes to Maria Aitken’s fabulous turn as the manipulative Lady Edwina Mountbatten.

The Eureka Entertainment release features a 1080p HD transfer on the Blu-ray, with a progressive encode on the DVD, optional English subtitles, and original trailer.

 

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Burnt Offerings (1976) | Why does Dan Curtis’ American Gothic haunted house chiller still frighten me so?

Burnt Offerings (1976)

This is the face of the man who scared the bejesus out of my 12-year-old self… and he’s coming back to haunt me once again with Arrow’s HD release of Dan Curtis’ 1976 horror Burnt Offerings – coming out tomorrow (17 October).

burnt_offerings_3d

Ben (Oliver Reed) and Marian (Karen Black) can’t believe their luck when they rent a vast country mansion for just $900 for the entire summer. All they have to do is look after the house as if it was there own – and to take a daily tray up to the elderly and reclusive Mrs Allardyce.

But as they settle in with their son Davey (Lee Montgomery) and Ben’s beloved aunt Elizabeth (Bette Davis), the house begins to exerts a dark influence on the inhabitants – especially Marian, who becomes obsessed with the unseen old lady at the top of the stairs.

As more strange occurrences take place, it soon becomes evident to Ben that the house is an evil living presence… Can he convince Marian to leave with the family before its too late?

Burnt Offerings (1976)

Burnt Offerings is one of the most underrated chillers of all-time. Co-written, produced and directed by the legendary Dan Curtis (Dark Shadows, Trilogy of Terror), and adapted from the 1973 Robert Marasco novel by Logan’s Run author William F Nolan, its a rare thing indeed: being subtle in its horror, featuring a standout cast, and spinning social commentary in its inventive take on the old haunted house story: one in which the viewer becomes an unwitting voyeur as the family firstly fall under the house’s spell, then slowly being consumed by it.

Burnt Offerings (1976)

There are scenes that have haunted me for decades: like the rough house play between father and son in the swimming pool that turns deadly dangerous, the house shedding its old shingles as it rejuvenates itself, and that grinning ghostly chauffeur that haunts Ben’s visions. The fact that the chauffeur was the spitting image of my own dad only added to my own nightmares. And don’t start me on that chimney…

Burnt Offerings (1976)

From the cameos by Burgess Meredith and Eileen Heckart to child actor Lee Montgomery, everyone in the cast is brilliant, especially scary-eyed Karen Black whose transformation into the house’s clean-freak servant (in Victorian gothic garb, of course) is genuinely disturbing. But for me, it’s Bette Davis who really impresses. Watching her carefree, chain-smoking Aunt Elizabeth wither away before our eyes is terribly sad and truly terrifying.

Burnt Offerings (1976)

It’s been decades since I first saw Burnt Offerings, and revisiting it, I prayed that I would not be disappointed. Thankfully I wasn’t. If anything, I’ve learned to appreciate it even more as it’s not only an excellent exercise in creeping terror, it also has an insightful underlying theme about the destruction of the American Dream in possessing material things.

Burnt Offerings (1976)

THE ARROW SPECIAL FEATURES
• High Definition Blu-ray and Standard Definition DVD presentation of the feature, transferred from original film elements by MGM. (This is the same print as the Kino Lorber release, and looks terrific. It’s so pristine, you can practically feel the sweat and blood pouring off poor Ollie Reed, and the shadowy cinematography really shines).
• Original uncompressed PCM mono audio.
• Optional English subtitles.
• Audio commentary with Dan Curtis, Karen Black and William F Nolan. I’m so going to nominate this for a Rondo. It’s not only informative and insightful, it’s an important historical record as both Dan Curtis and Karen Black are no longer with us.
• Audio commentary with film critic Richard Harland Smith. (After hearing Curtis and co, I haven’t really bothered with this… as yet).
Acting His Face: Interview with actor Anthony James (aka that scary chauffeur).
Blood Ties: Interview with actor Lee Montgomery. This is what I sought out first after revisiting the movie, and its great to hear about Lee’s experiences of working with theatrical giants like Bette Davis (who took him under her wing) and Oliver Reed (who got him drunk).
From the Ashes: Interview with screenwriter William F Nolan (this guy is legend)
• Animated gallery
• Trailer
• Collector’s booklet (first pressing only).

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Watch the skies! Invasion: UFO gets an exclusive release in HD!

Invasion_UFO_Blu-ray

Ahead of the restored Blu-ray release of Gerry Anderson’s cult 1970s sci-fi series UFO later this year in the UK, the feature-length compilation Invasion: UFO is now available to buy on Blu-ray exclusively through: networkonair.com.

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Earth’s greatest fear becomes a reality when UFOs are finally confirmed – the aliens come from a dying planet millions of light years away, seeking human organs to repair their own decaying bodies. And mankind’s only hope at stopping the alien terror is SHADO, a top secret defence organisation headed up by Edward Straker (Ed Bishop), a former American Air Force Colonel, and his loyal team including first officer (George Sewell) Alex Freeman, computer specialist Virgina Lake (Wanda Ventham) and former test pilot Paul Foster (Michael Billington).


Created on videotape for syndication in Europe and America, Invasion: UFO is an amalgamation of the episodes Identified, Computer Affair and Reflections in the Water. To bridge continuity gaps, segments from ESP and Confetti Check A-OK were also used, while the ending was taken from The Man Who Came Back. If you have never seen the series before, then this makes for fantastic taste of things to come.

Having been resized in full 16:9 widescreen from restored High Definition elements sourced from the original 35mm negatives, Invasion: UFO looks better than it has ever been, and is presented here with both original mono and Dolby 5.1 soundtracks. The special extras include the original 1980 videotape version (which just shows how much work has gone into the restoration), the 1980 trailer, full-frame opening and end titles, and textless end titles.

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