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The Cat and the Canary (1939) | Bob Hope and Paulette Goddard are a class act in the creaky comedy chiller

The Cat and the Canary (1939)

‘Don’t big empty houses scare you?’ ‘Not me, I used to be in vaudeville!’
A slick mix of wisecracking comedy and spooky thrills, the 1939 classic comedy chiller, The Cat and the Canary, turned Bob Hope into a Hollywood star and won Paulette Goddard a 10-year contract with Paramount.

The Cat and the Canary (1939)

One of the earliest ‘old dark house’ mysteries, first filmed as a silent in 1927 (watch t below), it was tailored to Hope’s characteristic style which he’d go onto hone in his buddy comedies with Bing Crosby, and gave Goddard the chance to shine as the spirited heroine. Together they play a radio actor and an heiress who turn up at a decrepit old mansion in a mist-shrouded Louisiana swamp for the reading of a will. Secret passages, a portrait with eyes that move, a valuable diamond necklace, and an escaped lunatic keep the couple and a cast of eccentric characters on their toes until the final act, in which Goddard’s spunky ‘canary’ is lured into an underground passage by the shadowy ‘Cat’.

The Cat and the Canary (1939)

Stylishly staged and filled with a suitably spooky atmosphere, it boasts wonderfully gloomy performances from George Zucco as a stiff lawyer and Gale Sondergaard as the sinister housekeeper. Following this film. Zucco and Sondergaard went on to play the villainous Moriarty and The Spider Woman in Universal’s big-screen Sherlock Holmes adventures opposite Basil Rathbone.

The success of the film led to Hope and Goddard re-teaming for The Ghost Breakers (1940), while John Willard’s classic story was later remade by erotic arthouse director Radley Metzer in 1979. The film was also the model for the Frankie Howerd comedy The House on Nightmare Park in 1970 (see my review here).

The Cat and the Canary (1939)

THE UK RELEASE
The Cat and the Canary is available on DVD from Fabulous Films in the UK, and includes as extras, a trailer and three galleries.

THE TRAILER

THE 1927 SILENT IN FULL

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Lost Horizons: Beneath the Hollywood Sign | A darkly comic memoir on some of Tinseltown’s forgotten faces

Lost Horizons: Beneath the Hollywood SignFrom Universal’s classic monster movies of the 1930s to the fleshpot romps of Russ Meyer in the 1960s, and the European arthouse antics of Fellini and Visconti in the 1970s, cult movies have become part of the fabric of contemporary culture, and we all have fond memories of them.

But what of the actors and actresses you recognise, but whose names you can’t quite remember? We’ve all heard of the King of Horror, Boris Karloff, but can you remember any of the players he starred with in The Mummy, like the exotic Zita Johann or the charming David Manners?

Remember when the late veteran actress Gloria Stuart became the oldest person to be nominated for an Academy Award for Titanic back in 1997? Did you know she worked for Universal in the 1930s (in classics like James Whale’s The Old Dark House), a period which also saw actresses like Gale Sondergaard at their peak before being caught up the McCarthy blacklisting fiasco in the 1950s. Remember her? And what about that great scene in 1978’s Damien: Omen II when Elizabeth Shepherd‘s reporter gets her eyes pecked out by crows. Did you know she was one of Britain’s leading stage actresses in the 1960s. Whatever happened to her?

Lost Horizons: Beneath the Hollywood Sign

From writer, historian and one-time agent, David Del Valle comes the darkly comic memoir, Lost Horizons: Beneath the Hollywood Sign, which follows his own personal journey over 25 years, meeting and befriending many of the old-time and obscure players whose dreams of fame and fortune never quite worked out the way they quite intended.

The late, great Vincent Price described Hollywood as one of the most evil cities on the planet, and he had witnessed enough in his lifetime not to kid around – unlike some of his contemporaries, who got burned on their journey through Tinseltown’s stratosphere. Reading Del Valle’s entries, you certainly get the picture – Hollywood is a Hell of a place to make a living.

Some tragic, some suprising, some plain shocking, the stories are many – too many to explore here in detail here. But whether they’re ancient silent movie actors whose only stage in later life are the cocktail parties they host or attend; or big name veteran stars like John Carradine, Christopher Lee and Vincent Price giving their honest take on living in this Hollywood Babylon, survival is the key theme.

Lost Horizons: Beneath the Hollywood Sign

One of the saddest must be the tragic story of Johnny Eck, best known as the Half-Boy in 1932’s Freaks. After retiring from acting, Eck turned his hand to art and photography, but was left traumatized following a brutal home invasion. The incident left him housebound and fearful for the rest of his sad life. Then there’s Les Baxter, the undisputed king of Exotica. Baxter was living a lonely life in music exile when Del Valle met him. Depressed over unsuccessfully suing John Williams for lifting some of his music for his ET score, Baxter died before his style of lounge music became cool again.

There’s also some deliciously gossipy entries, including one in which Del Valle describes actress Hermione Baddeley and singer Martha Raye entertaining the patrons of a leather bar in West Hollywood, only for the German director Rainer Werner Fassbinder wanting to meet these grand dames. What a sight that would have been.

Lost Horizons: Beneath the Hollywood Sign

Del Valle also has some intimate encounters with some truly offbeat heroes. He gets high on gin and joints watching The Loved One with the film’s writer Terry Southern, the cool hipster immortalized on the Sgt Pepper’s album; trips on LSD with Timothy Leary over Charlie Chan movies; and gets a tour of Russ Meyer’s home, filled with memorabilia from his saucy sex films, including a giant bra.

It all makes for some revealing reading. And, despite the odd typo, I couldn’t put it down as each chapter offered a glimpse into the private lives of an actor, actress, writer, director, musician or muse who have given cinephiles everywhere such joy and excitement over the past 70 years. Less salacious than Kenneth Anger’s infamous trash bible Hollywood Babylon, but no less gossipy, Del Valle’s memoir is a truly touching portrait of the people that were very much a part of old Hollywood. Thankfully, Del Valle has given these fading characters their proper dues, making them shine for us film fans once more.

Lost Horizons: Beneath the Hollywood Sign is available from Amazon

From The Cat Creature to Killdozer and Trilogy of Terror, the ABC Movie of the Week was pure TV gold

Movie of the Week logo

For anyone growing up in the early-1970s, the ABC Movie of the Week (which originally aired in the US from 1969-1976) was their earliest exposure to a world of weird, for it was these ‘big movies made for the small screen’ that both veteran film-makers and young guns got the chance to create crazy, offbeat projects, the most memorable being the ones that delved into horror, the supernatural, sci-fi and psychological terror.

Dennis Weaver in Duel

It was here that Steven Spielberg launched his career with Duel (which ended up getting a cinema release on the back of its success on TV in the US), while the late great Curtis Harrington got to make camptastic fare like How Awful About Alan; and Dan Curtis (he of TV’s Dark Shadows fame) scared the pants off impressionable kids – like myself – with Karen Black’s massive eyebrows and a murderous Zuni doll in Trilogy of Terror (without doubt my all-time favourite).

Karen Black in Trilogy of Terror

The TV strand gave veteran Hollywood stars like Bing Crosby, John Carradine, Gloria Swanson, Gale Sondergaard, Olivia De Havilland and many more the chance to show off their starry talents (although some not so gracefully – like Swanson in Killer Bees: truly dreadful), while household names like Bewitched‘s Elizabeth Montgomery showed they could do more than twitch their nose (who can forget her chilling turn as Lizzie Borden?). Roddy McDowall, meanwhile, seemed be in every one of them. The ABC Movie of the Week was also the launching pad for some of TV most memorable genre-busting shows like The Immortal, The Night Stalker, The Six Million Dollar Man and Starsky and Hutch. Truly, this was the golden age for telly movie making.

ABC Movie of the Week

Are you a fan of the ABC Movie of the Week, then why not check out the Facebook fan group (click here) or check out Michael Karol’s book The ABC Movie of the Week Companion: A Loving Tribute to the Classic Series (available from Amazon)

[youtube:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rM-Vkd7On2Q%5D
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