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Son of Unsung Horrors | Rediscovering the neglected genre films of yesterday has never been so much fun!

Son of Unsung Horrors

Just when you thought your bookshelf was safe comes Son of Unsung Horrors, a brand new exploration of some 200 neglected, overlooked, and seemingly under-appreciated genre films from the silents to the 1970s.

Gorgeously illustrated with vintage photos, lobby cards and posters and boasting a Foreward from John Landis and covetable cover art by Paul Garner, this 400-page tome joins Unsung Horrors and the über-collectable 70s Monster Memories as another must-have from We Belong Dead maestro Eric McNaughton.

Each film has been selected, appraised and held aloft by a host of film fans (from newbie writers to bloggers and published authors) and there are gems galore just waiting for your to rediscover.

Although listed in alphabetical order at the end of the book, Eric and co-editor extraordinaire Darrell Buxton have placed the titles at random. This ends up working to the book’s advantage – as you never know what fantastic find is lurking over the page.

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Having seen quite a few of the titles myself, I immediately checked out all of the unfamiliar ones first – and there are some real doozies. There’s the suave Paul Naschy giallo Blue Eyes of the Broken Doll; the spellbinding Book of Stone (remade in 2009 as El Libro de Piedra); and the DH Lawrence-inspired Corruption of Chris Miller, which all hail from Spain.

Over in Italy, meanwhile, there’s the Copenhagen-set film noir Crimes of the Black Cat; the Franco Nero giallo The Fifth Cord, which teases a pulsating Morricone beat; and the Bergmanesque chiller The Long Night of the Veronique; plus there’s some other tasty Euro entries, including the oddball Death Laid an Egg and Jean Rollin’s Normandy-set love letter to expressionism Demoniacs.

Well-researched and written up with passion and style, these entries really got me very excited to seek them out. The same goes with the chapters about Jean Epstein’s 1928 classic La Chute de la Maison Usher and the Tower of the Seven Hunchbacks, a 1940’s comedy thriller with elements of Dali, Buñuel and Fritz Lang (now that I have to see).

The Fifth Cord (Giornata nera per l’ariete), 1971

Horrors of Malformed Men, 1969

Demoniacs (Les Démoniaques), 1974

Further afield, some Japanese flicks certainly piqued my interest, including the euro guro Horrors of Malformed Men (which I’ve known about – because of a single lurid photo in Denis Gifford’s Pictorial History of Horror Movies, but never actually seen), the spectral spookfest Ghost Story of Kasane Swamp, and the freakish curiosity Blind Beast, based on a story by mystery writer Taro Hirai (aka Japan’s Edgar Allan Poe, Edogawa Rampo).

A little closer to home, 1928’s Maria Marten maybe impossible to see – but the history behind the true crime makes for fascinating reading. Then there’s the 1940s British suspensers The Ghost of Rashmon Hall and Crimes at the Dark House, the latter featuring Tod Slaughter at his madest, which I shall be checking out soon.

Of course, there are a few titles I won’t be in any rush to see (sorry, I’m not going to vent here), but there are some I’m now tracking down: namely the 1971 man versus insects docu-drama The Hellstrom Chronicle and the formerly-banned British public information film The Finishing Line, which puts a dystopian spin on a school sports day.

But the Unsung Horror that gets my vote as the book’s stand-out gem goes to the 1970 British thriller, I Start Counting, starring Jenny Agutter (in one of her first movie roles) as a 14-year-old girl who develops an unhealthy interest in a series of local sex killings. Boasting a terrific score from Basil Kirchin (I’ve since bought the Johnny Trunk album re-relase), I’ve got this one on the top of my list to seek out (see the link below).

Now, I’ve since gone back to the start of the book to read all those titles that I’m more familar with, and some have reignited my love for some genre classics, including Phase IV, The Power and – yes, Vincent Price’s Madhouse. Oh and talking of Vinnie, I’ve also contributed a chapter on the first cinematic adaptation of a HP Lovecraft story, 1964’s The Haunted Palace.

ORDER YOUR COPY OF SON OF UNSUNG HORRORS HERE

For your perusual, I have included a list of every film covered in the book below, plus links to the titles currently available to view on YouTube (although I do stress that to see them in all their glory to hunt down their officially licensed home entertainment release).

If you fancy reading my takes on some of these titles, then just click on the READ MORE links.

The Amazing Mr Blunden
The Black Pit of Dr M
The Black Room
The Black Sleep
The Black Torment
Blind Beast
Blue Eyes of the Broken Doll
The Car
La Casa del Terror
The Case of the Scorpions Tail
Cat O Nine Tails (READ MORE)
Circus of Horrors
The Colossus of New York
Colossus, the Forbin Project
The Corruption of Chris Miller
The Creature Walks Among Us
The Curse of the Mummy’s Tomb
The Deadly Mantis
Death Laid an Egg
The Demoniacs
Demons of the Mind
Destroy All Monsters
The Devil Doll
Dr Black and Mr Hyde
Dr Cyclops (READ MORE)
Dracula (1974) (READ MORE)
Dracula AD 1972
The Earth Dies Screaming
Exorcist II
Female Vampire
The Final Programme (READ MORE)
First Man Into Space (READ MORE)
Flesh and the Fiends
Frankenstein: The True Story (READ MORE)
Frisson du Vampire
Le Ghost
The Ghost Galleon
The Ghost of Rashomon Hall
The Ghost Ship
Ghost Story
The Grip of the Strangler
The Haunted Palace (READ MORE)
Hausu (READ MORE)
He Who Gets Slapped
The Hidden Hand
Horrors of Malformed Men
House of Dark Shadows
House of Dracula
House of the Damned
Hunchback of Notre Dame
The Hyena of London
I Married a Monster
I, Monster
I Vampiri
The Island
The Island of Dr Moreau
Island of Terror
The Killer Reserved 9 Seats
King Kong
King Kong Escapes
The Last Wave
Let’s Scare Jessica to Death
The Long Night of Veronique
Long Weekend
Mad Love
Madhouse
The Magician
Man of a Thousand Faces
Man Who Could Cheat Death
Man Who Haunted Himself (READ MORE)
The Man Who Laughs
Maniac Mansion
The Manitou
Maria Marten
Mark of the Wolfman
The Medusa Touch (READ MORE)
The Mole People
The Monster
Mr Sardonicus
The Mystery of Edwin Drood
The Night Monster
Night My Number Came Up
Night of the Bloody Apes
Night of the Eagle
Night of the Lepus
Nightwing
No Blade of Grass
L’Ossessa
The Phantom of Crestwood
Phase IV
Phantom of Hollywood
Phantom of the Rue Morgue
Picnic at Hanging Rock (READ MORE)
The Pit (READ MORE)
The Power
Requiem for a Vampire
El Retorno El Hombre Lobo
Schlock
7 Faces of Dr Lao
Sh! The Octopus
Soul of a Monster
The Spectre of Edgar Allan Poe
The Swarm
Targets
The 10th Victim (READ MORE)
Theatre of Death
Time After Time
The Tingler
Torture Garden
Tower of London (1939) (READ MORE)
The Velvet Vampire
When Dinosaurs Ruled the Earth
White Reindeer
The Wolfen

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A Celebration of Peter Cushing | A 300-page love letter to the Gentleman of Horror

From the team behind 70s Monster Memories, Unsung Horrors and We Belong Dead magazine, comes this 300-page love letter to the Gentleman of Horror, Peter Cushing.

Featuring contributions from a global roster of established writers and dedicated fans – A Celebration of Peter Cushing covers the versatile actor’s most famous roles, including the Baron in Hammer’s Frankenstein series and Van Helsing in the studio’s Dracula franchise, as well as his portrayals as Sherlock Holmes, Doctor Who and Star Wars’ Grand Moff Tarkin, plus his memorable roles in a host of genre hits – and misses. There are also lots of chapters dedicated to Cushing’s legacy, in print, on stage, radio and vinyl, and in art; as well as features on his hobbies and his muse, his beloved wife Helen.

A true labour of love, gorgeously designed (with a retro eye) with full colour spreads boasting fantastic photos, posters and lobby cards; a foreward from Hammer scream queen-turned-artist Veronica Carlon; an interview with Cushing’s personal secretary Joyce Broughton; and an archival one from the great man himself, this another must-have for any serious film buff.

ORDER NOW BY CLICKING THIS LINK

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Unsung Horrors | From the makers of 70s Monster Memories comes another ‘giant’ must-read for Monster Kids

unsung-horrors

From the team behind last year’s sell-out tome 70s Monster Memories, Unsung Horrors is the latest film book for genre fans that’s being snapped by collectors as I write. Covering more than 200 (see the full list below) neglected, unappreciated or forgotten horror and fantasy films from the silents to the 1970s, this labour of love has been written by fans for fans, and is designed with a fantastic nostalgic nod over 448 pages packed with stills, posters and lobby cards. And to top it all, it comes with the blessing of Gremlins director Joe Dante.

Now, having contributed three articles to the book myself (The House That Screamed, The Last Man on Earth and Scream and Scream Again), I might be a little biased in saying that this is a MUST-HAVE in your cult film library. But don’t just take it for me, here’s what others have been saying… and once you have read these, you’ll find a handy link to purchase your copy while stocks last. And according to the book’s editor, Eric McNaughton, a second volume is currently being put together. Joy, oh joy!

Unsung Horrors

‘This lavish new oversized softcover from the publishers of the British magazine We Belong Dead…. starts with Seven Deaths in the Cat’s Eye and goes on from there. Foreword by Joe Dante, no less, and the delightful cover art by Paul Garner makes the package literally irresistible.’ Tim Lucas, Video Watchdog

‘Simply put, if I were able to create something as worthy as Unsung Horrors I could die a happy man, secure in the knowledge that I introduced fans new and old to a wealth of gems they may never have otherwise encountered. Unsung Horrors cleared away decades of cobwebs and made me feel the same as I did way back in 1973 when I was eight years old and first saw A Pictorial History of Horror Movies.’ Ginger Nuts of Horror

Unsung Horrors‘The writers of these essays offer something that can’t be bottled or replicated through research (though there’s plenty of that as well): the collected knowledge of growing up watching genre movies. That horror fans should treat themselves to a copy of Unsung goes without saying. The best writers don’t require you to come in with a pre-existing love for a subject but, through their writing, spark an interest you never knew you had. That’s Unsung Horrors.’ That’s Not Current

Unsung Horrors‘In addition to well-researched retrospectives of films lurking in the darkest annals of horror history, there is an introduction from a man who needs no introduction – Joe Dante. The book is a follow-up to their Rondo-nominated best-seller 70s Monster Memories, which is now almost impossible to purchase as every copy sold out. Unsung Horrors will only be available for a limited time as well, so if you’re interested in the history of our beloved genre’s overlooked gems, it’s an essential pick-up.’ Dread Central

‘Those of you who were lucky enough to snap up a copy …. Monster Memories will know what to expect here – pages and pages and pages of lurid loveliness, packed with amazing pictures and informative text filled with friendly enthusiasm for our favourite subject…..this is easily the film book of the year.’ The Dark Side

unsung-horrors-book-page-8-1-300x424‘Unsung doesn’t necessarily mean unknown, so aficionados will probably recognize many of these titles from browsing video store shelves, devouring specialty genre magazines, or stumbling upon a trailer within the depths of YouTube. The question to ask is: how many have you actually seen? Drawing from my own experience, more than a few are the types of films I’ve sworn I’ve watched only to realize that I merely read a synopsis on the back of a VHS cover without having rented the damn thing. There are, of course, a myriad of reasons these titles never got a fair shake: lack of audience interest upon release; maligned by critics; considered a minor work in a filmmaker’s oeuvre; shoved into a chasm of distribution hell; or simply didn’t fit the mold of their respective eras and vanished from consciousness. The purpose of Unsung Horrors is to acquaint readers with these titles that have been buried in some manner by time and neglect, unearthed here by fellow discerning devotees. While most of the films are not masterpieces by any stretch, they are worthy of rediscovery, at least in the hearts of the contributors who are moved to convince you of their value. Many are, in fact, masterpieces, and there are good arguments presented here in defense of their reputations. The point is, even among horror fans, these films are rarely discussed, and this book is a wonderful way to provoke reappraisal‘. Chris Hallock, Diabolique Magazine (READ THE FULL REVIEW HERE)

ORDER HERE: http://unsunghorrors.co.uk/

HOW MANY HAVE YOU SEEN? | THE FULL LIST OF UNSUNG HORRORS
Seven Dead In The Cat’s Eye
Goke – Body Snatcher From Hell
Bug
Craze
The Asphyx
Orca
And Soon The Darkness
Sssssss
Baron Blood
Levres de Sang
Lake of Dracula
The Black Cat
All The Colours Of The Dark
Matango
It
Galtiki – The Immortal Monster
The Lodger
The 7th Victim
Blood and Roses
The Monkey’s Paw
The Lost Continent
Kongo
Doctor X
Death Line
The Black Panther
The Crazies
Onibaba
Grizzly
Inquisition
Curse Of The Faceless Man
Chosen Survivors
The Face at the Window
Murders In The Zoo
The Long Hair Of Death
The Deathmaster
The Living Skeleton
Frogs
Behemoth The Sea Monster
Dark Places
The Green Slime
The Projected Man
The Clairvoyant
Sugar Hill
Diary Of A Madman
The Golem
Nightmare Castle
The Castle Of The Fly
Doomwatch
Willard
Equinox
Damned In Venice
The Face Of Fu Manchu
Werewolf Shadow
House Of Mystery
Frankenstein 1970
Deathdream
The Frozen Dead
The Ghost Of Frankenstein
Seven Footprints To Satan
Devil Doll
Dracula Pere Et Fils
Jonathan
Les Raisins De La Mort
The Haunted House Of Horror
Crypt Of The Living Dead
Il Demonio
Viy
Shock Waves
Four Flies On Grey Velvet
The House That Screamed
The Sphinx
Jack The Ripper
Curse Of The Devil
The Manster
Black Zoo
IT! The Terror From Beyond Space
In Search Of Dracula
Le Golem
Kill Baby Kill
The Return Of Dracula
Children Of The Damned
Lady Frankenstein
The Beast With Five Fingers
Tintorera
A Study In Terror
Jaws 2
Legend Of The Werewolf
Doctor Blood’s Coffin
The Living Dead At The Manchester Morgue
Day Of The Animals
The Pack
Dark Intruder
The Shuttered Room
Lorna The Exorcist
Castle Of The Walking Dead
Man Made Monster
The Black Scorpion
The Werewolf
Castle Of The Living Dead
Kuroneko
Mother Rilley Meets The Vampire
The Tell-Tale Heart
The Vampire Bat
The Dark Eyes Of London
Mystery Of The Mary Celeste
Night Of The Seagulls
Atom Age Vampire
Race With The Devil
Cry Of The Werewolf
Werewolf Of London
The Unknown
The Perfume Of The Lady In Black
An Angel For Satan
The Devil Bat
The Black Belly Of The Tarantula
The Bat Whispers
Red Queen Kills 7 Times
Kingdom Of The Spiders
Revenge Of The Blood Beast
Trog
The Secret Of Dorian Gray
Horror Rises From The Tomb
The Loreley’s Grasp
The Snake Girl And The Silver-Haired Witch
Nothing But The Night
The Strange Door
The Virgin Of Nuremberg
The Legend Of Blood Castle
Devils Of Darkness
Supernatural
Murders In The Rue Morgue
The House With Laughing Windows
Who Can Kill A Child
The Alligator People
The Comeback
Blood From The Mummy’s Tomb
The Mask Of Fu Manchu
The House In Nightmare Park
Lizard In A Woman’s Skin
The Psychopath
Terror Creatures From The Grave
Pharaoh’s Curse
The Last Man On Earth
The Devil Commands
Tormented
The Legend Of Hell House
Castle Sinister
Scream And Scream Again
Twice Told Tales
The Undying Monster
Lady Morgan’s Vengance
The Student Of Prague
The Horrible Dr. Hichcock
Mill Of The Stone Women
Werewolf In A Girls’ Dormitory
The Fall Of The House Of Usher
Squirm
Dr Pyckle And Mr Pryde
Le Testament Du Docteur Cordelier
The Dunwich Horror
Witchcraft
Son Of Kong
The Queen Of Spades
Macbeth
The Hands Of Orlac
Tower Of Evil
Bloodstained Butterfly
Three Cases Of Murder
Murders In The Rue Morgue
The Cremator
What Have You Done To Solange
The Most Dangerous Game
Nightmare In Wax
Where Has Poor Mickey Gone..?
The Face Behind The Mask
The Naked Prey
Phantom Of The Paradise
The Devil’s Nightmare
Scream Blacula Scream
The Mummy’s Hand
El Baron Del Terror
The Curse Of The Living Corpse
Ben
The Incredible Melting Man
Tentacles
And Now The Screaming Starts
Damien Omen II
The Naked Jungle
House Of Horrors
The Four Skulls Of Jonathan Drake
The Man From Nowhere
Tombs Of The Blind Dead
Fahrmann Maria
Tower Of London
The Return Of The Vampire
Lonely Water

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Pre-order 70s Monster Memories Now!

70s Monster Memories-coverFrom the makers of We Belong Dead comes the ultimate trip down memory lane – 70s Monster Memories. With over 70 chapters covering every aspect of 1970s horror – books, mags, posters, trading cards, TV, model kits, comics, movie tie-ins, super 8 and much more – this labour of love from the writers of the UK magazine will have a limited run, making it a dead cert to become a must-have collector’s item.

• 400 pages in full colour beautifully illustrated (see a sample of the pages below).

• Publication date is 20 December 2015.

• Cover price is £35 plus £5 postage UK (Overseas postage on request).

• Pre-order now and get it for the special price of £30 + postage.

• Order through the We Belong Dead shop now!

http://webelongdead.co.uk/product/70s-monster-memories/

Monster Memories 1 mosnter memories 270s Monster Memories-inset

We Belong Dead’s 70’s Monster Memories Book Wants You!

70s Monsters Memories BookThe folks behind the fabulous UK horror fanzine WE BELONG DEAD are planning on a fantastic new book covering all aspects of 70s Monster Memories from the BBC double bills to Monster Mag and everything inbetween! This will be the definitive work on being a monster kid in the 70s.

If you’d like to donate (even £1 will be a great help) to make the book a reality, just click on the link: https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/70s-monster-memories-book#home

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